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Article ID: 696690

Research Paves Way for Novel Therapy to Treat Osteoporosis, Atherosclerosis

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

A recent study by University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System (CAVHS) researchers shows that a type of blood protein we are all born with protects against osteoporosis, illuminating the potential for a novel approach to treatment.

Released:
27-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696659

José Biller, MD, is Co-editor of New Textbook on Uncommon Causes of Stroke

Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine neurologist José Biller, MD, is co-editor of an authoritative new textbook on uncommon causes of stroke. "Uncommon Causes of Stroke" is a comprehensive guide for healthcare professionals diagnosing, treating and assessing complex causes of strokes and other cerebrovascular disorders.

Released:
26-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696662

In Women, Even Mild Sleep Problems May Raise Blood Pressure

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

For women, even mild sleep problems can raise blood pressure, finds study.

Released:
26-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696608

Study Shows Leadless Pacemaker Patients Experience Less Complications

Cleveland Clinic

Patients receiving leadless pacemakers experience overall fewer short-term and mid-term complications than those receiving traditional transvenous pacemakers, a Cleveland Clinic-led research study found. The study was published today in the journal Heart Rhythm.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696630

Caring for Your Heart During Cancer Treatment

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Mrs. Goins is seeing a cardiologist as part of her cancer treatment because anthracyclines, a class of chemotherapy drugs used to treat breast cancer patients, can weaken the heart and lead to congestive heart failure years down the road in some patients. Pre-emptive treatment, including exercise, can help keep the heart strong.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696474

New Cellular Pathway Helps Explain How Inflammation Leads to Artery Disease

Cedars-Sinai

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696436

Bisexual Men Have Higher Risk for Heart Disease

New York University

Bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors, finds a new study published online in the journal LGBT Health.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696353

Life-Saving Stroke Educational Program Goes Global

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In an effort to improve stroke recognition and reduce life-threatening pre-hospital delays worldwide, researchers at Penn Medicine created a universal stroke awareness program, Stroke 112.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696346

Weight Loss Reverses Heart Condition in Obesity Sufferers

University of Adelaide

Australian research shows for the first time that obese people who are suffering from atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696315

Floppy Eyelids May Be Sign of Sleep Apnea, Loyola Study Finds

Loyola University Health System

A Loyola Medicine study is providing further evidence that floppy eyelids may be a sign of sleep apnea. The study found that 53 percent of sleep apnea patients had upper eyelids that were lax and rubbery.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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