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  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694531

Omega-3, Omega-6 in Diet Alters Gene Expression in Obesity

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

Released:
14-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694552

Early Depression Diagnosis is Deadly Serious for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

Florida State University

While some clinicians may not always prioritize depression screening in patients with coronary artery disease, an early diagnosis could be a matter of life and death.

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14-May-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694538

Vaccine-Induced Antibodies Against One Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Found to Disarm Related Virus for Which There Is No Vaccine

Harvard Medical School

Research conducted in vitro shows two human antibodies made in response to vaccination against one hemorrhagic fever virus can disarm a related virus, for which there is currently no vaccine. The proof-of-principle finding identifies a common molecular chink in the two viruses’ armor that renders both vulnerable to the same antibodies. The results set the stage for a single vaccine and other antibody-based treatments that work against multiple viral “cousins” despite key differences in their genetic makeup. Such therapies can alleviate challenges posed by current lack of vaccines and prevent outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fevers.

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14-May-2018 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694537

Researchers Identify Novel Therapy Strategy for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Potential for Cardiovascular Disease

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Preclinical and early clinical research conducted by teams at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and in Australia suggests that patients with rheumatoid arthritis could lower their risk of cardiovascular disease through cholesterol-lowering therapies.

Released:
14-May-2018 2:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694541

Study Finds Acetaminophen Helps Reduce Acute Kidney Injury Risk in Children Following Cardiac Surgery

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Children who underwent cardiac surgery were less likely to develop acute kidney injury if they had been treated with acetaminophen in the first 48 hours after their procedures, according to a Vanderbilt study just published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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14-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694525

Heart Disease Severity May Depend on Nitric Oxide Levels

Case Western Reserve University

The most common heart medications may get an assist from nitric oxide circulating in the body, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers showed that nitric oxide may help commonly used heart drugs maximize their benefits while improving heart function. In turn, the study found nitric oxide deficiencies could underlie heart failure while tilting drug effects toward more harmful pathways and side effects.

Released:
14-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694478

New Book by Nathan Bryan, Phd., Explains Why Nitric Oxide Is the “Holy Grail” of Cardiovascular Medicine

Nathan Bryan, Ph.D.

A new book, Functional Nitric Oxide Nutrition: Dietary Strategies to Prevent and Treat Chronic Disease, published today by Nathan Bryan, Ph.D., one the nation’s top experts on nutrition science and Nitric Oxide (NO), empowers consumers with nutritional science information that is not considered by most physicians and healthcare practitioners, and explains new insights that are vital to taking control of their health.

Released:
14-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694252

Atrial Fibrillation Patients Diagnosed with Carotid Atery Disease Face Increased Risk of Dementia, New Study Finds

Intermountain Medical Center

Atrial fibrillation patients who are diagnosed with carotid artery disease face higher risks for developing dementia, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

Released:
9-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694431

Study Identifies Receptor That May Be Targeted to Repair the Heart After Heart Attack, Cardiac Arrest

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have identified for the first time a receptor in the cell membranes of the heart that plays a key role in repairing damage caused by heart attack and cardiac arrest. The discovery of the receptor, in mouse and rat hearts, explains the mechanisms behind the protective effects of lipid emulsion and could improve treatments for humans with heart disease.

Released:
11-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694418

Highest Safety Rating for Adult Cardiac Surgery Awarded to Mount Sinai Surgeon

Mount Sinai Health System

David H. Adams, MD, Cardiac Surgeon-in-Chief and Chair of Cardiovascular Surgery at Mount Sinai Health System, has received the highest "two-star" safety rating from the New York State Department of Health.

Released:
11-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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