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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606325

Rethinking “The Code”

Stowers Institute for Medical Research

A decade ago, gene expression seemed so straightforward: genes were either switched on or off. Not both. Then in 2006, a blockbuster finding reported that developmentally regulated genes in mouse embryonic stem cells can have marks associated with both active and repressed genes, and that such genes, which were referred to as “bivalently marked genes”, can be committed to one way or another during development and differentiation.

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8-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606329

Newly Identified Genetic Factors Drive Severe Childhood Epilepsies

Duke Health

Researchers have identified two new genes and implicated 25 distinct mutations in serious forms of epilepsy, suggesting a new direction for developing tailored treatments of the neurological disorders. The findings by an international research collaboration, which includes investigators from Duke Medicine, appear Aug. 11 in the journal Nature.

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8-Aug-2013 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606360

Device Captures Signatures & Fingerprints with Tiny LEDs

Georgia Institute of Technology

Georgia Tech researchers want to put your signature up in lights. Using thousands of nanometer-scale wires, the researchers have developed a sensor device that converts mechanical pressure – from a signature or a fingerprint – directly into light signals that can be captured and processed optically.

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8-Aug-2013 9:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606384

Neuroscientists Identify Protein Linked to Alzheimer’s-Like Afflictions

New York University

A team of neuroscientists has identified a modification to a protein in laboratory mice linked to conditions associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. Their findings also point to a potential therapeutic intervention for alleviating memory-related disorders.

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9-Aug-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606407

Major Birth Defects Associated with Moderately Increased Cancer Risk in Children

University of Utah Health

Children born with non-chromosomal birth defects have a twofold higher risk of cancer before age 15, compared to children born without birth defects.

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10-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 606409

Nanodrug Targeting Breast Cancer Cells From the Inside Adds Weapon: Immune System Attack

Cedars-Sinai

A unique nanoscale drug that can carry a variety of weapons and sneak into cancer cells to break them down from the inside has a new component: a protein that stimulates the immune system to attack HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

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10-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 606380

Piano Fingers

American Physiological Society (APS)

Researchers have long been aware of a phenomenon in speech called coarticulation, in which certain sounds are produced differently depending on the sounds that come before or after them. A new study suggests that piano paying also involves coarticulation, with hand muscle contractions differing depending on the sequence of notes played.

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9-Aug-2013 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606369

Denis Jordanet: The Physiologist Who Discovered the Role of Low Blood Oxygen at High Altitude

American Physiological Society (APS)

We’ve known for well over a century that low blood oxygen causes altitude sickness. The origin of this idea has long been attributed to French researcher Paul Bert. But it’s really Bert’s benefactor, Denis Jourdanet, who deserves the credit, according to a new review article.

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9-Aug-2013 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606337

Researchers Identify Gene Variations in Lung Cancer Patients That May Help Predict an Individual’s Treatment Response

Moffitt Cancer Center

Researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center have identified four inherited genetic variants in non-small cell lung cancer patients that can help predict survival and treatment response. Their findings could help lead to more personalized treatment options and improved outcomes for patients.

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9-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 606364

New Insights Into the Polymer Mystique for Conducting Charges

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

With its ever-escalating pursuit of high efficiency and low cost, the electronics industry prizes understanding specific behaviors of polymers. Now there's help in appreciating the polymer mystique related to the emerging field of molecular conduction in which films of charge-transporting large molecules and polymers are used within electronic devices.

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9-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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