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Genetics

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Medicine

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Melanoma, gene proliferation, Immune Response, Personalized Medicine

Hundreds of Genes Distinguish Patients Likely to Survive Advanced Melanoma

Some melanoma patients can live for years with cancer that has spread beyond the skin to other organs. Now it may be possible to identify which patients are more likely to survive, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Medicine

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Hurler, Gene And Cell Therapy, Stem Cell, Lysosomal Storage Disease

Scientists Successfully Reprogram Blood Cells to Correct Lysosomal Storage Disease

Researchers have transplanted genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells into mice so that their developing red blood cells produce a critical lysosomal enzyme – preventing or reducing organ and central nervous system damage from the often-fatal genetic disorder Hurler’s syndrome.

Medicine

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Asthma, Genetics, Environmental Exposure

Asthma Not Determined by Genetics Alone

While progress has been made in identifying 39 genes potentially associated with asthma, the disease is complex, and its development is likely dependent upon both genetics and environmental exposures.

Science

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Genomics, Genome Sequencing, Horse, equine disease, Human Disease, disease gene mapping, Genetic Variation, SNPs, Chromosomes, Evolution

Horse Genome Sequence and Analysis Published in Science

An international team of researchers has decoded the genome of the domestic horse Equus caballus, revealing a genome structure with remarkable similarities to humans and more than one million genetic differences across a variety of horse breeds. In addition to shedding light on a key part of the mammalian branch of the evolutionary tree, the work also provides a critical starting point for mapping disease genes in horses.

Medicine

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Long Qt Syndrome, Cardiology, Genetic Testing

Research Findings Key for Understanding, Interpreting Genetic Testing for Long QT Syndrome

Results of a long QT syndrome (LQTS) study published in the current issue of Circulation play an important role in understanding genetic testing’s role in diagnosing disease, according to the senior author, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D. A pediatric cardiologist at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Ackerman directs Mayo’s Long QT Syndrome Clinic and is the director of the Mayo Clinic Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory.

Medicine

Science

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Stem Cells, Cancer, Pluripotent, Epigenetics, Genetics, differentially methylated regions

Scientists Reveal How Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Differ from Embryonic Stem Cells and Tissue of Derivation

The same genes that are chemically altered during normal cell differentiation, as well as when normal cells become cancer cells, are also changed in stem cells that scientists derive from adult cells, according to new research from Johns Hopkins and Harvard.

Science

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Genome Research, Genome Sequencing, Biodiversity

Scientists Propose a "Genome Zoo" of 10,000 Vertebrate Species

In the most comprehensive study of animal evolution ever attempted, an international consortium of scientists plans to assemble a genomic zoo--a collection of DNA sequences for 10,000 vertebrate species, approximately one for every vertebrate genus.

Science

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Diabetes, Fruit Fly, Genetics

Scientists Create Fruit Fly Model to Help Unravel Genetics of Human Diabetes

mutant-fly.jpg

Researchers at the University of Maryland are using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model system to unravel what genes and gene pathways are involved in the metabolic changes that lead to insulin resistance and full-blown diabetes in humans.

Science

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Barrett's Esophagus, Esophageal Cancer, Genetic Susceptibility, genome-wide association study

$7.9 Million Grant for Esophageal Cancer Study Goes to Hutchinson Center Researcher

Thomas Vaughan, M.D., head of the Epidemiology Program in the Public Health Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, has received a three-year, $7.9 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study genetic susceptibility for Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, a rapidly fatal cancer whose incidence has increased more than 500 percent in the past 30 years, faster than any other cancer in the United States.

Medicine

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Sight, Blindness, Visual Impairment, Retina, Blood Vessels, Genetics

Sight Gone, but Not Necessarily Lost?

Like all tissues in the body, the eye needs a healthy blood supply to function properly. Poorly developed blood vessels can lead to visual impairment or even blindness. While many of the molecules involved in guiding the development of the intricate blood vessel architecture are known, only now are we learning how these molecules work and how they might affect sight. Reporting in the Oct. 16 issue of Cell, researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine find that when some cells in the mouse retina are not properly fed by blood vessels, they can remain alive for many months and can later recover some or all of their normal function, suggesting that similar conditions in people may also be reversible.







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