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Article ID: 583443

Gene Is First Linked to Herpes-Related Cold Sores

University of Utah Health

A team of researchers from the University of Utah and the University of Massachusetts has identified the first gene associated with frequent herpes-related cold sores.

Released:
29-Nov-2011 6:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 583400

Seaweed Hotspots, Illegal Logging, and Discovering New Species Under the Desert

University of Adelaide

More than 450 world experts from 60 countries will converge on Adelaide, Australia this week to discuss the importance of DNA "barcoding" - a rapidly growing international initiative to develop a genetic identity tool for all plants and animals on Earth.

Released:
29-Nov-2011 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 583360

Splice Now or Splice Later

Rutgers University

Cells often multi-task when synthesizing and splicing RNA. But when unconventional splicing is required, they synthesize first and splice later, according to a study led by researchers at the Public Health Research Institute at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School and published in Cell .

Released:
28-Nov-2011 1:30 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Nov-2011 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 583134

Two-Spotted Spider Mite Genome May Yield Better Pesticides

University of Utah

A University of Utah biologist and an international research team decoded the genetic blueprint of the two-spotted spider mite, raising hope for new ways to attack the major pest, which resists pesticides and destroys crops and ornamental plants worldwide.

Released:
20-Nov-2011 11:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 583213

Scientists Genetically Increase Algae Biomass by More than 50 Percent

Iowa State University

Research at Iowa State University has led to discovery of a genetic method that can increase biomass in algae by 50 to 80 percent. The breakthrough comes from turning on certain genes in algae that increase the amount of photosynthesis in the plant, which leads to more biomass.

Released:
21-Nov-2011 1:50 PM EST
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Article ID: 583161

Tweaking a Gene Makes Muscles Twice as Strong

Salk Institute for Biological Studies

An international team of scientists has created super-strong, high-endurance mice and worms by suppressing a natural muscle-growth inhibitor, suggesting treatments for age-related or genetics-related muscle degeneration are within reach.

Released:
21-Nov-2011 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Nov-2011 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 583077

One for You, One for Me: Researchers Gain New Insight Into the Chromosome Separation Process

Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Each time a cell divides—and it takes millions of cell divisions to create a fully grown human body from a single fertilized cell—its chromosomes have to be accurately divvied up between both daughter cells. Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research used, ironically enough, the single-celled organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae—commonly known as baker’s yeast—to gain new insight into the process by which chromosomes are physically segregated during cell division.

Released:
17-Nov-2011 1:40 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Nov-2011 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 582664

Novel Method Discovered to Reveal the Genetic Relatedness Between Individuals

Kennedy Krieger Institute

Kennedy Krieger researcher finds unexpected familial relationships in data widely used by biomedical research community.

Released:
7-Nov-2011 4:15 PM EST
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Article ID: 582546

Quebec Genealogical Research Provides Clues to Genetic Consequences of Human Migration Patterns

Universite de Montreal

Research published in Science today reveals that the first individuals settling on new land are more successful at passing on their genes than those who did not migrate.

Released:
3-Nov-2011 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 582404

No Increased Risk of Breast Cancer for Non-Carriers in Families with BRCA Gene Mutation

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

Summary of a study being published online October 31, 2011, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology finding that close relatives of women who carry mutations in a BRCA gene – but who themselves do not have such genetic mutations ¬– do not have an increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to relatives of women with breast cancer who do not have such mutations. These results run counter to a previous study showing a higher risk for these women, and suggest they may not need extra cancer screening and other preventive measures

Released:
31-Oct-2011 4:50 PM EDT
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