Feature Channels:

Cell Biology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

microbioloby, Cell Biology, Proteins, Gene Expression

Like a Transformer? Protein Unfolds and Refolds for New Function

New research has shown that a protein does something that scientists once thought impossible: It unfolds itself and refolds into a completely new shape. When it refolds, it acquires a new function – another finding researchers would not have predicted.

Science

Channels:

Aging, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology

Does Presence of Oxidants Early in Life Help Determine Life Span?

Why do we age, and what makes some of us live longer than others? For decades, researchers have been trying to answer these questions by elucidating the molecular causes of aging.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer Stem Cells, Breast Cancer, Her2, Herceptin, IL6R blockade

Inflammatory Pathway Spurs Cancer Stem Cells to Resist HER2-Targeted Breast Cancer Treatment

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered one reason why the cancer cells become resistant to Herceptin: They turn on a completely different pathway, one that is involved in inflammation, fueling the cancer independently of HER2.

Medicine

Channels:

Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Mutations, Aging

Hundreds of Random Mutations in Leukemia Linked to Aging, Not Cancer

AML24_Cell_Cover_v8ghires.jpg

Hundreds of mutations exist in leukemia cells at the time of diagnosis, but nearly all occur randomly as a part of normal aging and are not related to cancer, new research shows.

Science

Channels:

World's Toughest Bacterium Holds Promise for Rapid Vaccine Development Against Deadly Diseases

Scientists from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) have developed a new preparation method that renders a virus or bacterium non-infectious while preserving its immune-boosting ability after exposure to gamma radiation. A lethally irradiated vaccine was successfully tested in mice against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria by colleagues at the National Institutes of Health and holds promise for other such deadly diseases.

Medicine

Channels:

Ultrasound Triggers Bone Cell Mobility

Qin_lab_34_fin.JPG

Research led by Yi-Xian Qin, PhD, Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Director of the Orthopaedic Bioengineering Research Laboratory at Stony Brook University, demonstrated that the use of medium-intensity focused ultrasound on osteoblasts, known as bone-forming cells, stimulates the mobility of the cells and triggers calcium release, a process that promotes growth. The technique could provide a foundation for a method to develop non-pharmacologic treatments of osteoporosis, fractures, and other conditions involving bone loss. The team’s research findings are detailed online in the PLoS One article “Mechanobiological Modulation of Cytoskeleton and Calcium Influx in Osteoblastic Cells by Short-Term Focused Acoustic Radiation Force.”

Science

Channels:

Cord Blood Cells, Neurons, CB cells, cell-replacement therapies

Neurons Derived From Cord Blood Cells May Represent New Therapeutic Option

belmontepnas1.jpg

For more than 20 years, doctors have been using cells from blood that remains in the placenta and umbilical cord after childbirth to treat a variety of illnesses, from cancer and immune disorders to blood and metabolic diseases.

Science

Channels:

Tubulin, left-right asymmetry, Xenopus, C. Elegans, laterality, Michael Levin

Plants and Vertebrates Share Mechanism for Placement of Organs

Levin1_713.jpg

Biologists at Tufts University have produced the first evidence that a class of proteins that make up a cell's skeleton -- tubulin proteins -- drives asymmetrical patterning across a broad spectrum of species, including plants, nematode worms, frogs, and human cells, at their earliest stages of development.

Medicine

Channels:

Helper T Cells, Not Killer T Cells, Might Be Responsible for Clearing Hepatitis A Infection

Helper cells traditionally thought to only assist killer white blood cells may be the frontline warriors when battling hepatitis A infection. These are the findings from a Nationwide Children’s Hospital study appearing in a recent issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Medicine

Channels:

Newly Isolated “Beige Fat” Cells Could Help Fight Obesity

BruceSpiegelman2_2.JPG

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have isolated a new type of energy-burning fat cell in adult humans which they say may have therapeutic potential for treating obesity.







Chat now!