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Article ID: 562170

Others May Know Us Better than We Know Ourselves

Washington University in St. Louis

Humans have long been advised to “know thyself,” but new research suggests we may not know ourselves as well as we think we do. While individuals may be more accurate at assessing their own neurotic traits, such as anxiety, it seems friends, and even strangers, are often better barometers of traits such as intelligence, creativity and extroversion.

Released:
10-Mar-2010 2:10 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 562169

Confidence Is Key to Gauging Impressions We Make

Washington University in St. Louis

The gift of “seeing ourselves as others see us” comes in handy when judging how we’ve made a first impression. Yet many come away with little or no clue about how that first impression was perceived. A new study suggests confidence is a key indicator of how well we've assessed impressions left behind.

Released:
10-Mar-2010 1:30 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Mar-2010 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 562047

‘Pay It Forward’ Pays Off

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego and Harvard deliver the first experimental findings that cooperative behavior spreads person to person to person in a social network.

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5-Mar-2010 1:35 PM EST
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Article ID: 562041

NIH Student Award Winner Exploring How Couples Cope with Breast Cancer

University of Delaware

Amber J. Belcher, a doctoral student in psychology at the University of Delaware, has won the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The fellowship will support Belcher's research on how couples cope with breast cancer.

Released:
5-Mar-2010 11:15 AM EST
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Article ID: 561970

Study Finds No Consensus in Definitions of 'Had Sex'

Indiana University

When people say they "had sex," what transpired is anyone's guess. A new study from the Kinsey Institute found that no consensus existed when a representative sample of 18- to 96-year-olds was asked what the term meant to them.

Released:
4-Mar-2010 12:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 561954

Parkinson’s Disease Makes It Harder to Figure Out How Other People Feel

American Psychological Association (APA)

Scientists are beginning to find out why people with Parkinson’s disease often feel socially awkward. Parkinson’s patients find it harder to recognize expressions of emotion in other people’s faces and voices, report two studies published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
3-Mar-2010 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 561914

Shopping for Happiness? Get a Massage, Forget the Flat-Screen TV

Cornell University

Consumers found that satisfaction with “experiential purchases” – from massages to family vacations – starts high and increases over time. In contrast, spending money on material things feels good at first, but actually makes people less happy in the end, says Thomas Gilovich, Cornell University professor of psychology and Travis J. Carter, Cornell Ph.D. ’10. (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology).

Released:
2-Mar-2010 5:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 561875

People Sometimes Less Trusting When in A Good Mood

Ohio State University

It seems to make perfect sense: happy people are trusting people. But a new study suggests that, in some instances, people may actually be less trusting of others when they are in a pleasant mood.

Released:
2-Mar-2010 10:15 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 561743

Does the Devil Really Wear Prada? The Psychology of Anthropomorphism and Dehumanization

Association for Psychological Science

People talk to their plants, pray to humanlike gods, name their cars, and even dress their pets up in clothing. We have a strong tendency to give nonhuman entities human characteristics (known as anthropomorphism), but why? A new report examines the psychology of anthropomorphism.

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25-Feb-2010 2:20 PM EST
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Article ID: 561682

Intelligent People Have “Unnatural” Preferences and Values That Are Novel in Human Evolutionary History

American Sociological Association (ASA)

Higher intelligence is associated with liberal political ideology, atheism, and men’s (but not women’s) preference for sexual exclusivity. More intelligent people are statistically more likely to exhibit social values and religious and political preferences novel human evolutionary history.

Released:
24-Feb-2010 11:00 AM EST
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