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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2018 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696130

Gut Microbes May Contribute to Depression and Anxiety in Obesity

Joslin Diabetes Center

Like everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings – and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.

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17-Jun-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696207

Research Society on Alcoholism annual meeting 2018: Featured research findings Full press releases available for the following presentations

Research Society on Alcoholism

The 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) will take place in San Diego June 17-20. RSA 2018 provides a meeting place for scientists and clinicians from across the country, and around the world, to interact. The meeting also gives members and non-members the chance to present their latest findings in alcohol research through abstract and symposia submissions. Below are seven programming highlights. Full press releases available upon request.

Released:
17-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
20-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
15-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696148

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive

University of California San Diego

Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at of large groups of neurons and individual brain cells.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696153

Nine UIC students named Schweitzer Fellows

University of Illinois at Chicago

Nine University of Illinois at Chicago students have been awarded Schweitzer fellowships, a service learning program for health professional students committed to helping Chicago’s underserved.Named in honor of humanitarian and Nobel Laureate Dr. Albert Schweitzer, the fellowship encourages exceptional students in health and human service fields to serve the most vulnerable members of society, including the uninsured, immigrants, the homeless, returning veterans, minorities and the working poor.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696138

International Research Team Finds Brain Changes Linked to Sleep Need

UT Southwestern Medical Center

We’ve all experienced going to bed tired and waking up refreshed, yet how that happens at the molecular level remains a mystery. An international study published today in Nature sheds new light on the biochemistry of sleep need in the brain.

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14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696141

New Study of Youth Hospitalizations Finds 24 Percent of Behavioral-Related Admissions Complicated by Suicidality or Self-Harm

Case Western Reserve University

A recent study published in American Psychiatric Association’s Psychiatric Services journal found previous research on youth hospitalizations associated with behavioral and mental disorders failed to adequately consider children exhibiting suicidality or self-harm. Previous studies assigned behavioral health disorders, such as depression, as the primary diagnosis, while identifying suicidality or self-harm as a secondary diagnosis. By looking closely at the data, the new study found that nearly 24 percent of all behavioral-related admissions are complicated by suicidality or self-harm.

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14-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696144

'Teachers are brain engineers': UW study shows how intensive instruction changes brain circuitry in struggling readers

University of Washington

Using MRI measurements of the brain's neural connections, or “white matter,” UW researchers have shown that, in struggling readers, the neural circuitry strengthened — and their reading performance improved — after just eight weeks of a specialized tutoring program. The study, published June 8 in Nature Communications, is the first to measure white matter during an intensive educational intervention and link children's learning with their brains' flexibility.

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14-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696143

EEG can determine if a depressed patient will do better on antidepressants or talk therapy

University of Illinois at Chicago

People react differently to positive events in their lives. For some, a small reward can have a large impact on their mood, while others may get a smaller emotional boost from the same positive event.These reactions can not only be objectively measured in a simple office evaluation, but researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago report that they can help clinicians determine whether a patient with anxiety or depression is responding to treatment and if they will do better on an antidepressant drug, or in talk therapy.

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14-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696126

Researcher reveals new cell type in human brain that plays crucial role in visual search

West Virginia University

Every day, people are asked to find something – a familiar face in a crowd, a child in the park, a particular house on a street. While researchers have long-since known that the ability to effectively search and detect goal-relevant targets is controlled by top-down signals from the brain’s frontal area, a researcher from West Virginia University has found evidence that the human medial temporal lobe – or MTL – also plays an essential role in this process.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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