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Article ID: 695521

Mechanotargeting of Cancer Cells

Penn State Materials Research Institute

Diseased cells such as metastatic cancer cells have markedly different mechanical properties that can be used to improve targeted drug uptake, according to a team of researchers at Penn State.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 12:55 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695501

In Nature Materials Paper, Researchers Describe New Method to Boost Electron Mobility, Conductivity

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Two chemistry researchers from Missouri University of Science and Technology are part of an international team that has designed a new metal-organic framework that exhibits dramatic improvements in electron mobility, which could lead to new applications for fuels cells, batteries and other technologies.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 677920

How an Enzyme Repairs DNA, Controlling DNA-Based Robots, Neural Stem Cells Helping to Repair Spinal Cord Injuries, and More in the Cell Biology News Source

Newswise

The latest research and features in cell biology in the Cell Biology News Source

Released:
1-Jun-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695481

How Just Drops of Viper Venom Pack a Deadly Punch

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Researchers at Brazil's largest producer of antivenoms report a structural analysis of glycans modifying venom proteins in several species of lancehead viper. The snakes are among the most dangerous in South America. The report offers insight into the solubility and stability of toxic proteins from venom, and into how venoms from different species vary. Scientists are now working to map glycan structures back onto the proteins they modify.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695383

From Face Recognition to Phase Recognition: Neural Network Captures Atomic-Scale Rearrangements

Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—If you want to understand how a material changes from one atomic-level configuration to another, it’s not enough to capture snapshots of before-and-after structures. It’d be better to track details of the transition as it happens. Same goes for studying catalysts, materials that speed up chemical reactions by bringing key ingredients together; the crucial action is often triggered by subtle atomic-scale shifts at intermediate stages.

Released:
31-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695247

Drugs That Suppress Immune System May Protect Against Parkinson’s

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study shows that people who take drugs that suppress the immune system are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, which is characterized by difficulty with movement.

Released:
29-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-May-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695293

Less Is More When It Comes to Predicting Molecules’ Conductivity

University of Chicago

Forward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality. The trouble is, some molecules have particularly complex interactions that make it hard to predict which of them might be good at serving as miniature circuits. But a new paper by two University of Chicago chemists presents an innovative method that cuts computational costs and improves accuracy by calculating interactions between pairs of electrons and extrapolating those to the rest of the molecule.

Released:
30-May-2018 12:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695349

Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from blood

University of California San Diego

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria along with the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.

Released:
30-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695324

Changing the Surroundings Improves Catalysis

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Water changes how cobalt-based molecule turns carbon dioxide into chemical feedstock.

Released:
30-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695312

A splash of detergent makes catalytic compounds more powerful

Sandia National Laboratories

Uniform powders produced at Sandia National Laboratories don’t just look nice, they outperform commercial varieties used to kick-start chemical reactions in solar cells and could be used to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel. Their key ingredient: detergent.

Released:
30-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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