Feature Channels:

Chemistry

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Business

Channels:

Improving Fuel Economy, High School Scientists, Highly Sensitive Sensors, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Science

Channels:

Biomaterials, Coronary Stents, coronary angioplasty, FANTOM 5, Fantom, REVA Medical, Joachim Kohn, Edison Patent Awards, R&D Council of NJ, Innovation, Invention, Rutgers University

Rutgers University Receives 2017 Edison Patent Award For Polymer Used to Develop World’s First Fully Resorbable, X-Ray Visible Stent

A breakthrough patent – the polymer that enabled the development of the world’s first fully resorbable and x-ray visible coronary stent – invented by a Rutgers University researcher received the 2017 Edison Patent Award from the Research & Development Council of New Jersey. The award memorializes the state’s most prolific inventor, Thomas Alva Edison, and highlights the Garden State’s continuous pipeline of exceptional innovation work.

Medicine

Channels:

The Rural Healthcare Gap, Caregiver Burnout, Is Fixing Obamacare Feasible, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Science

Channels:

Nanosensor, Brain, Neurotransmitter, Brain Chemistry, Imaging, Brain Imaging, Antidepressant, Markita del Carpio Landry, Abraham Beyene, University of California, Berkeley, AVS 64th International Symposium & Exhibition, AVS

Nanosensors Demystify Brain Chemistry

AVS-Landry-BrainImgNeuro-UCB.jpg

Nanosensors are incredible information-gathering tools for myriad applications, including molecular targets such as the brain. Neurotransmitter molecules govern brain function through chemistry found deep within the brain, so University of California, Berkeley researchers are developing nanosensors to gain a better understanding of exactly how this all plays out, and will discuss their work at the AVS 64th International Symposium & Exhibition, Oct. 29-Nov. 3, 2017, in Tampa, Florida.

Science

Channels:

Surface Chemistry, Materials Science, atomic-scale, Chemical Reactions, molecular reactions, Alec M. Wodtke, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Arthur L. Utz, Tufts University, Leiden University

Modeling Surface Chemistry and Predicting New Materials

The ruddy flakes of a rusted nail are a sure sign that an undesirable chemical reaction has occurred at the surface. Understanding how molecules and atoms behave with each other, especially at surfaces, is central to managing both desirable chemical reactions, such as catalysis, and undesirable reactions, like a nail’s corrosion. Yet the field of surface chemistry has been challenged for nearly 100 years to develop predictive theories for these reactions. Now there’s progress, thanks to some new approaches.

Science

Channels:

Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, materials sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, materials scientists, Chemistry of Materials, Advanced Materials, optical patterning, Films, Polymers, conducting polymer , conductors, University of California at Davis, University of Calif

Honey, I Shrunk the Features for Low-Cost, Flexible, Large-Area Electronics

BES-2017-10-s-lrg.jpg

Exploiting reversible solubility allows for direct, optical patterning of unprecedentedly small features.

Science

Channels:

electronic skin

Jellyfish-Inspired Electronic Skin Glows When It Gets Hurt

Electronic-skin technologies for prosthetics and robots can detect the slightest touch or breeze.But oddly, the sensors that make this possible do not respond effectively to a harmful blow. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a jellyfish-inspired electronic skin that glows when the pressure against it is high enough to potentially cause an injury.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Cancer, Iridium, Dinosaur, dinosaur extinction, Cells, Cancer Cell, Singlet Oxygen, Chemistry

Cancer Cells Destroyed with Dinosaur Extinction Metal

sadler.jpg

Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.

Science

Channels:

dragonfly, dragonfly colors, dragonfly wings, glitterwing, Photonic Crystals, Electron Microscopy, color mechanism, Ashley Ellsworth, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Physical Electronics, Inc., AVS 64th International Symposium and Exhibition, AVS, Biomimicry

Discovering the Source of Dragonfly Wing Colors

AVS-Carr-DragonflyWing.jpg

Dazzling dragonfly wings may send poets rhapsodizing, but scientists yearn for a better understanding. In particular, they want to know the chemistry of the different layers giving rise to natural photonic crystals that help create color. Now, a collaboration of Brazilian researchers have teamed up with Minnesota experts to puzzle out the color mechanism of the male Amazonian glitterwing dragonfly.

Science

Channels:

Research, Rankings, University Of Michigan, science publications, physical sciences, Life Sciences, Chemistry, Environmental Sciences, Research Funding

U-M Ranks 8th in US for Research Output

A new ranking shows the research strength of the University of Michigan in the natural sciences, placing it in the top 10 of American institutions for producing articles in the most selective science publications. Among publicly funded institutions, U-M placed fourth.







Chat now!