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Infectious Diseases

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Medicine

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Ebola, Uveitis, Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells , RPE cells, Vision Loss, Blindness, Vision Research, Opthalmalogy, Eye Disease, eye disease research, Ebola virus disease

Ebola Lingers in Survivors’ Eyes

Three years after an Ebola epidemic swept across West Africa, researchers have found a clue to how the virus may live on in the eyes of survivors suffering from uveitis – one of the more serious and common complications of the disease.

Medicine

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Glaucoma Recovery, Corneal Inflammation, IRD Trial, and More in the Vision News Source

The latest research and feature news on vision in the Vision News Source

Medicine

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Colorectal Cancer, Infection Control, Cancer Prevention, Cancer Treatment

Bacteria Actively Drive Development of Colorectal Cancer

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Colorectal cancer is fairly treatable when caught early with regular screenings, but it is still the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men and the third-leading cause in women.

Medicine

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Most Wired Hospitals, Training with the NFL, Parent/Doctor Relationship, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

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Skeletons, Anthropology, D, Social inequality, Poverty, Health, Sickness, Syphilis, Tuberculosis, Pneumonia, Infectious Diseases, Mississippi State University

MSU Anthropology Professor Looks to the Past to Understand Modern Disease Transmission

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A fascination with skeletons and the clues they provide about those who lived in the past led Molly Zuckerman to pursue a career in anthropology. Now an associate professor in Mississippi State University’s Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures, Zuckerman is using lessons from ancient skeletal remains to guide insight into the spread of diseases today.

Medicine

Channels:

C. Difficile, Clostridia, Hospital-acquired condition, c. diff, Calcium, Intestinal Bacteria, Spores

Could Calcium Hold the Key to Fighting a Dangerous Hospital Infection?

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It lurks in hospitals and nursing homes, preying upon patients already weak from disease or advanced age. It kills nearly 30,000 Americans a year, and sickens half a million more. But new research shows that Clostridium difficile bacteria can’t do this without enough of a humble nutrient: calcium. That new knowledge may lead to better treatments.

Medicine

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zika, Pregnancy, Zika birth defects, Vaccine

Vaccines Protect Fetuses From Zika Infection, Mouse Study Shows

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A new study in mice shows that females vaccinated before pregnancy and infected with Zika virus while pregnant bear pups who show no trace of the virus. The findings offer the first evidence that an effective vaccine can protect vulnerable fetuses from Zika infection and resulting injury.

Medicine

Science

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Biology, Genetics, Internal Medicine, Public Health, Diseases In Developing World, infectious and emerging disease, pharmaceutial science

50-Year-Old Flu Virus Model Gets Facelift

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The scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine team’s discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn’t so perfect after all. The finding could give scientists the opportunity to better predict pandemics and find new ways to disrupt the flu virus.

Medicine

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bats, Pathogens, Viruses, Parasites, Diseases, Animal Research, Veterinary Medicine, Entomology

Study Reveals Interplay of an African Bat, a Parasite and a Virus

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A lack of evidence that bats are key reservoirs of human disease has not prevented their vilification or efforts to exterminate bat colonies where threats are presumed to lurk. “The fact is that they provide important ecosystem services ... and we want them around,” says Tony Goldberg, a University of Wisconsin-Madison epidemiologist and virus hunter. “But bats are also increasingly acknowledged as hosts of medically significant viruses. I have mixed feelings about that.”

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Behavioral Economics, nudges, Health Care Costs, Gamification, Financial Incentives, Infectious Diseases

When Push Comes to Nudge

The idea that better decisions can be made simply by guiding people to them is the principle behind the Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit, which officially launched last year. Looking to the year ahead, projects both on-going and up-coming are using some of the most basic principles of behavioral economics – gamification, financial incentives, and default settings – to tackle costly health interventions and some of the leading causes of death and other health risks, including statin and opioid use, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and readmissions.







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