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Article ID: 694790

Researchers Mimic Comet Moth’s Silk Fibers to Make “Air-Conditioned” Fabric

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

In exploring the optical properties of the Madagascar comet moth’s cocoon fibers, Columbia Engineering team discovers the fibers’ exceptional capabilities to reflect sunlight and to transmit optical signals and images, and develops methods to spin artificial fibers mimicking the natural fibers’ nanostructures and optical properties

Released:
17-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694763

Supersonic Waves May Help Electronics Beat the Heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice—a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat management in future electronics devices.

Released:
17-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694760

New Blood Test Rapidly Detects Signs of Pancreatic Cancer

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers have developed a test that can screen for pancreatic cancer in just a drop of blood. The test, which is at the proof-of-concept stage, provides results in under an hour. It's simple: apply a drop of blood on a small electronic chip, turn the current on, wait several minutes, add fluorescent labels and look at the results under a microscope. If a blood sample tests positive for pancreatic cancer, bright fluorescent circles will appear.

Released:
17-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694697

Argonne’s TechConnect Hat Trick

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne National Laboratory nanoscientist Anirudha Sumant has earned a TechConnect Innovation Award for the third year in a row. The award recognizes Sumant’s work on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamonds for application as a portable electron source in field emission cathodes. The technology was developed in partnership with Euclid Techlabs to create a superior field emission electron source for use in linear accelerators.

Released:
16-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694624

Making Carbon Nanotubes as Usable as Common Plastics

Northwestern University

By using an inexpensive, already mass produced, simple solvent called cresol, Northwestern University's Jiaxing Huang has discovered a way to make disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations without the need for additives or harsh chemical reactions to modify the nanotubes.

Released:
15-May-2018 2:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694488

Precise Control of Bulk, Multi-Component Nanostructures

Yanshan University

A new strategy has been devised that enables scientists to precisely create bulk, multi-component nanomaterials with the desired structures of constituents.

Released:
14-May-2018 3:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694383

Nanodiamonds Are Forever

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne researchers have created a self-generating, very-low-friction dry lubricant that lasts so long it could almost be confused with forever.

Released:
10-May-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694294

APS-CNM Users Meeting Helps Scientists Plan for an Even Brighter Future

Argonne National Laboratory

The Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials will host the APS-CNM Users Meeting to be held at Argonne from May 7 to 10.

Released:
9-May-2018 3:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694203

Engineers Studying Nanodefects Suspected of Causing Early Failures of Electrical Materials

Iowa State University

Breakdowns in electrical materials can lead to short circuits and blown fuses, robbing the power grid and even cell phones of reliability and efficiency. Iowa State's Xiaoli Tan is working to be the first to see and record how nanoscale defects in electrical insulators may evolve into material breakdowns.

Released:
8-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694140

Chemists Develop Improved Method to Create Artificial Photosynthesis

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Patent-pending method could lead to a reliable, economical and sustainable way to create and store energy from sunlight.

Released:
7-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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