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Article ID: 696238

Johns Hopkins Expert on Toxic Stress of Separating Children from Parents —U.S. Policy to Deter Border Crossing

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696101

Helicopter Parenting May Negatively Affect Children's Emotional Well-Being, Behavior

American Psychological Association (APA)

WASHINGTON -- It’s natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child’s ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 4:45 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2018 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696130

Gut Microbes May Contribute to Depression and Anxiety in Obesity

Joslin Diabetes Center

Like everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated a surprising potential contributor to these negative feelings – and that is the bacteria in the gut or gut microbiome, as it is known.

Released:
17-Jun-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695890

Psychologists Can Play a Key Role in Screening, Diagnosing, and Treating Alcohol Problems

Research Society on Alcoholism

Psychologists who are trained and experienced in treating alcohol problems can play an important role in treatment of both the affected individual as well as his or her family. This insight and others will be shared at the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.

Released:
10-Jun-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695889

Addictions are diseases of the brain, not personality defects or criminal behavior

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol dependence, and opiate, cocaine and other stimulant addictions, are all diseases of the brain that have behavioral manifestations and they are not due to criminal behavior alone or to antisocial or "weak" personality disorders. These observations and others will be shared during the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.

Released:
10-Jun-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695891

Empowering individuals with alcohol use disorders to chart their own pathway to recovery

Research Society on Alcoholism

Despite common stereotypes, alcohol treatment is not limited to attending Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings or “going to rehab.” A growing number of alcohol-treatment services in the U.S. are available as outpatient sessions with counselors and physicians; and now they can be found through NIAAA's Alcohol Treatment Navigator. These options and other real-world advice will be shared at the 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in San Diego June 17-21.

Released:
10-Jun-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696207

Research Society on Alcoholism annual meeting 2018: Featured research findings Full press releases available for the following presentations

Research Society on Alcoholism

The 41st annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) will take place in San Diego June 17-20. RSA 2018 provides a meeting place for scientists and clinicians from across the country, and around the world, to interact. The meeting also gives members and non-members the chance to present their latest findings in alcohol research through abstract and symposia submissions. Below are seven programming highlights. Full press releases available upon request.

Released:
17-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696172

To Share or Not to Share?

University of Vienna

When are primary school children willing to share valuable resources with others and when are they not? A team of researchers from the University of Vienna lead by cognitive biologist Lisa Horn investigated this question in a controlled behavioural experiment. The motivation to share seems to be influenced by group dynamical and physiological factors, whereas friendship between the children seems to be largely irrelevant. The results of their study have been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696141

New Study of Youth Hospitalizations Finds 24 Percent of Behavioral-Related Admissions Complicated by Suicidality or Self-Harm

Case Western Reserve University

A recent study published in American Psychiatric Association’s Psychiatric Services journal found previous research on youth hospitalizations associated with behavioral and mental disorders failed to adequately consider children exhibiting suicidality or self-harm. Previous studies assigned behavioral health disorders, such as depression, as the primary diagnosis, while identifying suicidality or self-harm as a secondary diagnosis. By looking closely at the data, the new study found that nearly 24 percent of all behavioral-related admissions are complicated by suicidality or self-harm.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696143

EEG can determine if a depressed patient will do better on antidepressants or talk therapy

University of Illinois at Chicago

People react differently to positive events in their lives. For some, a small reward can have a large impact on their mood, while others may get a smaller emotional boost from the same positive event.These reactions can not only be objectively measured in a simple office evaluation, but researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago report that they can help clinicians determine whether a patient with anxiety or depression is responding to treatment and if they will do better on an antidepressant drug, or in talk therapy.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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