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Exercise and Fitness

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Medicine

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Type 2 Diabetes, Exercise, Functional High Intensity Training, CrossFit Training, Beta-Cell Function, Insulin Production, Insulin Sensitivity, Blood Glucose Levels

Short, High-Intensity Exercise Sessions Improve Insulin Production in Type 2 Diabetes

A new study finds that short, functional-movement and resistance training workouts, called functional high-intensity training (F-HIT), may improve beta-cell function in adults with type 2 diabetes. Beta cells in the pancreas produce, store and secrete insulin, which allows your body to use sugar for energy. The small study is the first one of its kind to analyze beta-cell function in F-HIT or resistance training.

Medicine

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There's More to This Exercise Program for Older Adults Than Bicep Curls

Exercise is good for older adults. But what kind is best? The answer to that question is important. It may mean the difference between an older person living independently or having to move into a facility where someone helps them with daily living activities.

Medicine

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Exercise, Physical Activity, Brain Function, Cognitive Function, Deep Learning, Neurocognitive Functioning

Does Exercise Affect the Brain’s Aging Process? U-M Research Aims to Find Out

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Most people know that regular exercise can keep a body looking and feeling young. What about the brain? Michigan Medicine researchers were recently awarded a two-year grant to further examine the role physical activity plays on the brain.

Medicine

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COPD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Lung Health, respiratory care

Online Pulmonary Rehabilitation Not Inferior to Face-to-Face Rehab

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Online pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was found to be as effective as face-to-face rehabilitation programs at improving patients’ exercise capacity and symptom control, according to new research presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

Medicine

Science

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Bone Health, Marrow, Bone Fat, Endocrinology

Another Reason to Exercise: Burning Bone Fat – a Key to Better Bone Health

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For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers show that exercising burns the fat found within bone marrow and offers evidence that this process improves bone quality and the amount of bone in a matter of weeks.

Medicine

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Colon, Colorectal Cancer, Survivorship, Recurrence, Diet, Exercise, Prevention, Cancer, Body Weight, BMI

Eating Right and Exercising Could Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer Recurrence

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Colon cancer patients who have a healthy body weight, exercise regularly and eat a diet high in whole grains, fruits and vegetables have a significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence or death, according to a research team led by UC San Francisco investigators. This finding represents an analysis of data collected on patients participating in a national study for people with stage III colon cancer.

Medicine

Life

Education

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School, Exercise, obesity and children, Academic Performance, physical activity in children, Physical Activity In School

Being More Active in School Lessons Can Improve Performance in Tests

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Children who take part in lessons which include physical activity show an increase in health-enhancing physical activity and academic performance, according to research carried out by Leeds Beckett University.

Medicine

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American Fitness Index, Anthem, American College of Sports Medicine, Community Health, fittest cities, fittest cities in US, Public Health

10th Annual American Fitness Index Reveals Minneapolis-St. Paul as the Newest “Fit City”

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The twin cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul edged Washington, D.C. in the 10th annual American Fitness Index (AFI) released by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc.

Medicine

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Children, Sickle Cell Disease, Exercise, Inflammation

Is Exercise Safe for Kids with Sickle Cell Disease?

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While regular exercise is known to reduce inflammation over time, it actually increases inflammation in the short term. This is a concern for children with sickle cell disease, a condition that is marked by increased inflammation that can cause severe pain. The pain episodes in sickle cell disease are due to the abnormally shaped red blood cells that can get clogged in the blood vessels, a situation that could get exacerbated by more inflammation. But is there a level of exercise that is safe for these children? Primary Investigator Robert Liem, MD, from Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and colleagues will address this question in a five-year multicenter study recently funded by a $2.7 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

Medicine

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NCCN, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, jnccn, JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Exercise, Cancer, Oncology, nccn guidelines, Survivorship Care, supportive care, Gundersen Health System

Despite Evidence That It Benefits Patients with Cancer, Study Finds Most Oncologists Don’t Discuss Exercise with Patients

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As published in JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a Gundersen Health System study found that most patients look for guidance on physical activity during cancer care, but oncologists do not feel equipped to give recommendations.







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