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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2013 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608888

New Technology That Sorts Cells by Stiffness May Help Spot Disease

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have developed a new technology to sort human cells according to their stiffness, which might one day help doctors identify certain diseases in patients, according to a new study.

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14-Oct-2013 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608963

Microbiome Meets Big Social Science: What’s the Potential?

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Over the last decade or so, biologists have mustered an ever-growing appreciation for the essential role of microbial communities in a diversity of environments. “We’re recognizing that the biosphere is run by microbes at every level,” notes University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Margaret McFall-Ngai. “They are the pivotal, central players in the health of the planet.”

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15-Oct-2013 3:15 PM EDT
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Cell Biology

Article ID: 608961

Milk-Maker Hormone May Help Liver Regenerate

American Physiological Society (APS)

Prolactin has an important function in the liver, but how important? Researchers, using an animal model, found the animals with extra prolactin had larger livers, regenerated their livers faster after partial removal, and were significantly more likely to survive liver surgery compared to animals that couldn’t process prolactin.

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15-Oct-2013 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608920

Researchers Find Overexpressed Protein to Be Culprit in Certain Thyroid Cancers

UT Southwestern Medical Center

A specific protein once thought to exist only in the brain may play a crucial role in a deadly form of thyroid cancer, as well as other cancers, and provide a fresh target for researchers seeking ways to stop its progression, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report today in Cancer Cell.

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14-Oct-2013 4:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Oct-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608840

The Role of “Master Regulators” in Gene Mutations and Disease

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new way to parse and understand how special proteins called “master regulators” read the genome, and consequently turn genes on and off.

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10-Oct-2013 6:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608842

Cell Growth Discovery by UCSF Team Has Implications for Targeting Cancer

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

The way cells divide to form new cells — to support growth, to repair damaged tissues, or simply to maintain our healthy adult functioning — is controlled in previously unsuspected ways UC San Francisco researchers have discovered. The findings, they said, may lead to new ways to fight cancer.

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10-Oct-2013 8:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608833

Scientists Identify Protein Linking Exercise to Brain Health

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

A protein that is increased by endurance exercise has been isolated and given to non-exercising mice, in which it turned on genes that promote brain health and encourage the growth of new nerves involved in learning and memory, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

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10-Oct-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608492

Previously Unstudied Gene Is Essential for Normal Nerve Development

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Our ability to detect heat, touch, tickling and other sensations depends on our sensory nerves. Now, for the first time, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified a gene that orchestrates the crucially important branching of nerve fibers that occurs during development. The findings were published online today in the journal Cell.

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3-Oct-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608721

Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Progenitor Cells Before Tumors Become Visible

University of California San Diego Health

For the first time, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have isolated and characterized the progenitor cells that eventually give rise to malignant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors – the most common form of liver cancer. The researchers found ways to identify and isolate the HCC progenitor cells (HcPC) long before actual tumors were apparent.

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8-Oct-2013 4:45 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608728

Stomach Cells Naturally Revert to Stem Cells

Washington University in St. Louis

New research has shown that the stomach naturally produces more stem cells than previously realized, likely for repair of injuries from infections, digestive fluids and the foods we eat.

Released:
9-Oct-2013 9:00 AM EDT
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