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Article ID: 586585

Teaching Fat Cells to Burn Calories

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

In the war against obesity, one’s own fat cells may seem an unlikely ally, but new research from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) suggests ordinary fat cells can be reengineered to burn calories.

Released:
7-Mar-2012 5:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Mar-2012 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 586434

What Does Chronic Stress in Adolescence Mean at the Molecular Level?

University at Buffalo

Chronic stress has a more powerful effect on the brain during adolescence than in adulthood and now there’s proof at the molecular level, according to findings published in Neuron by University at Buffalo researchers.

Released:
5-Mar-2012 10:00 AM EST
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Cell Biology, Neuro

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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-2012 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 586473

Circadian Nitrogen Balance Impacts Survival, Susceptibility to Diseases

Case Western Reserve University

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine demonstrated that nitrogen balance, the process of utilizing amino acids and disposing of their toxic byproducts, occurs with a precise 24-hour rhythm – also known as circadian rhythm – in mammals.

Released:
5-Mar-2012 3:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Mar-2012 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 586306

Study Shows Advance in Using Patients’ Own Tumor-Fighting Cells to Knock Back Advanced Melanoma

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A small, early-phase clinical trial to test the effectiveness of treating patients with advanced melanoma using billions of clones of their own tumor-fighting cells combined with a specific type of chemotherapy has shown that the approach has promise. One patient of the 11 experienced a long-term, complete remission that has lasted more than three years, and in four others with progressive disease, the melanoma temporarily stopped growing. The results of the study are published in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for the week of March 5.

Released:
29-Feb-2012 10:25 AM EST
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Article ID: 586431

Making Memories: How One Protein Does It

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Studying tiny bits of genetic material that control protein formation in the brain, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have new clues to how memories are made and how drugs might someday be used to stop disruptions in the process that lead to mental illness and brain wasting diseases.

Released:
4-Mar-2012 11:45 PM EST
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Article ID: 586371

Biologists Offer Clearer Picture of How Protein Machine Systems Tweak Gene Expression

Indiana University

Indiana University biologists have found that specific types of RNA polymerase enzymes, the molecular machines that convert DNA into RNA, can differ in function based on variation in the parts -- in this case protein subunits -- used to assemble those machines.

Released:
1-Mar-2012 1:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2012 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 586334

UCLA Scientists Identify Cell and Signaling Pathway that Regulates the Placental Blood Stem Cell Niche

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA stem cell researchers have discovered a critical placental niche cell and signaling pathway that prevent blood precursors from premature differentiation in the placenta, a process necessary for ensuring proper blood supply for an individual’s lifetime.

Released:
29-Feb-2012 4:30 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2012 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 586354

Protein Complex Affects Cells’ Ability to Move, Respond to External Cues

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A team of UNC researchers has explained for the first time how a long-studied protein complex affects cell migration and how external cues affect cell’s ability to migrate.

Released:
1-Mar-2012 11:15 AM EST
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Article ID: 586356

Molecule's Role in Cancer Suggests New Combination Therapy

University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have found that a molecule found at elevated levels in cancer cells seems to protect them from the "cell-suicide" that is usually triggered by chemotherapy or radiation.

Released:
1-Mar-2012 11:25 AM EST
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Cancer, Cell Biology

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Article ID: 586279

Investigators Predict, Confirm How E. Coli Bacteria Hijack Cells’ Directional Mechanism

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Working in the emerging field of systems biology, UT Southwestern researchers mathematically predicted how bacteria that cause food poisoning hijack a cell’s sense of direction and then confirmed those predictions in living cells.

Released:
1-Mar-2012 12:05 AM EST
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