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Article ID: 603417

The Secret Lives (and Deaths) of Neurons

University of North Carolina Health Care System

University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers uncover surprising insights about how nerve cells rewire themselves, shedding light on a process linked with neurodegenerative diseases and neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia and autism.

Released:
23-May-2013 9:30 AM EDT
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    22-May-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 603294

How Immune System Peacefully Co-Exists with “Good” Bacteria

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The human gut is loaded with helpful bacteria microbes, yet the immune system seemingly turns a blind eye. Now, researchers know how this friendly truce is kept intact. Innate lymphoid cells directly limit the response by inflammatory T cells to commensal bacteria in the gut of mice. Loss of this ILC function effectively puts the immune system on an extended war footing against the commensal bacteria a condition observed in multiple chronic inflammatory diseases.

Released:
20-May-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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    20-May-2013 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 603232

Protein Study Suggests Drug Side Effects are Inevitable

Georgia Institute of Technology, Research Communications

A new study of both computer-created and natural proteins suggests that the number of unique pockets – sites where small molecule pharmaceutical compounds can bind to proteins – is surprisingly small, meaning drug side effects may be impossible to avoid.

Released:
17-May-2013 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 603023

Newly Described Type of Immune Cell and T cells Share Similar Path to Maturity

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Innate lymphoid cells protect boundary tissues such as the skin, lung, and the gut from microbial onslaught. They also have shown they play a role in inflammatory disease. Researchers have found that maturation of ILC2s requires T-cell factor 1 to move forward. They describe in Immunity that one mechanism used to build ILCs is the same as that in T cells. Both cell types use a protein pathway centered on Notch.

Released:
14-May-2013 1:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 602996

Zinc: The Goldilocks Metal for Bioabsorbable Stents?

Michigan Technological University

Some materials dissolve too quickly, before cardiac arteries can fully heal, and some hang around forever. Zinc, however, may be just right.

Released:
14-May-2013 9:05 AM EDT
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    13-May-2013 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 602899

Out of Sync: Body Clocks Altered at Cell Level in Depression

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Every cell in our bodies runs on a 24-hour clock, tuned to the night-day, light-dark cycles that have ruled us since the dawn of humanity. But new research shows that the clock may be broken in the brains of people with depression -- even at the level of the gene activity inside their brain cells.

Released:
10-May-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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    12-May-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 602873

Research On Cilia Heats Up: Implications For Hearing, Vision Loss And Kidney Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Experiments at Johns Hopkins have unearthed clues about which protein signaling molecules are allowed into hollow, hair-like “antennae,” called cilia, that alert cells to critical changes in their environments.

Released:
9-May-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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    9-May-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 602804

Scientists Find Key to Gene-Silencing Activity

Scripps Research Institute

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found how to boost or inhibit a gene-silencing mechanism that normally serves as a major controller of cells’ activities. The discovery could lead to a powerful new class of drugs against viral infections, cancers and other diseases.

Released:
8-May-2013 4:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 602832

Researchers Discover Dynamic Behavior Of Progenitor Cells In Brain

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By monitoring the behavior of a class of cells in the brains of living mice, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins discovered that these cells remain highly dynamic in the adult brain, where they transform into cells that insulate nerve fibers and help form scars that aid in tissue repair.

Released:
9-May-2013 10:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 602826

Your Immune System: On Surveillance in the War Against Cancer

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Wake Forest Baptist research looks at gene expression profiling in breast cancer.

Released:
9-May-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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