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Medicine

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Parkinson's Disease, Statin, Statins, Statin Use

Statins Should Not Be Used for Protection Against Parkinson’s Disease, Research Suggests

Use of statins may speed up the onset of Parkinson’s disease symptoms in people who are susceptible to the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Researchers Pinpoint How Detecting Social Signals May Have Affected How We See Colors

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The arrangement of the photoreceptors in our eyes allows us to detect socially significant color variation better than other types of color vision, a team of researchers has found. Specifically, our color vision is superior at spotting “social signaling,” such as blushing or other facial color changes—even when compared to the type of color vision that we design for digital cameras and other photographic devices.

Medicine

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Concussion, Brain Injury, Trauma

Concussion Effects Detailed on Microscopic Level

New research has uncovered details about subcellular-level changes in the brain after concussion that could one day lead to improved treatment.

Medicine

Life

Education

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University of Arkanas for Medical Sciences, UAMS, Neuro-oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Neuro-oncology fellowship, Carlos Romo, Orwa Aboud, Shirley Ong, Lee Archer, robert archer, NIH fellowship program

All Slots for Prestigious Neuro-Oncology Fellowship Filled by UAMS Residents

Two residents from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) have been selected for a prestigious fellowship in neuro-oncology administered jointly by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Neuro-Oncology Branch.

Medicine

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ALS, Dementia, RNA, FTD, Toxic Peptides, Proteins, genes, Harvard Medical School, HMS, Harvard Medical School Study, Splicing Errors, Amyothrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Frontotemporal Dementia, C9ORF72 gene, Robin Reed, Peptides, GR PR Peptides, U2 snRNP

Assembly Failure

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At a glance: Most frequent genetic cause of ALS and a form of dementia (FTD) is known to produce toxic peptides that interfere with RNA splicing—an intermediary step in generating functional proteins from genes. New Harvard Medical School study finds these toxic peptides block assembly of the cellular machinery responsible for RNA splicing. This blockage leads to splicing errors for genes that regulate the workings of mitochondria and neurons and the expression of other genes. Restoring normal splicing function may be a therapeutic strategy for averting or treating the development of ALS, FTD or both.

Medicine

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Cancer, Research, Patient Care, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ut Southwestern

Strategy of Hope: Patients Try Creative Approaches to Fight Brain Cancer

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Dennis Kothmann jots several numbers on a clipboard then pauses, his pen frozen on the last figure. His eyebrows furrow and he quietly mouths a calculation.

Medicine

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Men's Health Week: Get Moving for Heart and Brain Health

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Science

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Neuroscience, brainbow, Neuron

Molecule May Help Maintain Brain’s Synaptic Balance

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Many neurological diseases are malfunctions of synapses, or the points of contact between neurons that allow senses and other information to pass from finger to brain. In the brain, there is a careful balance between the excitatory synapses that allow messages to pass, and the inhibitory synapses that dampen the signal. When that balance is off, the brain becomes unable to process information normally, leading to conditions like epilepsy. Now researchers at Jefferson have discovered a molecule that may play a role in helping maintain the balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The results were published in the journal eLife.

Medicine

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genes, TBI, Sex Differences, Neuroinflammation, Brain Injury, Brain Inflammation

Female and Male Mice Suffer, Recover from TBI Differently

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In the first study of its kind, researchers say male mice have much greater brain distress in the week following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than female mice, including skyrocketing inflammation and nerve cell death.

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Balance and Movement Improved in Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

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Researchers at UCLA have developed a molecular compound that improves balance and coordination. The drug, called CLR01, also reduced the amount of a toxic protein in the brain thought to promote development of the disorder.







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