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Article ID: 698744

Inaugural Class of the Michael Brown Penn-GSK Postdoctoral Fellowship Award Program Commence Unique Collaborative Training

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Four Penn Medicine postdoctoral trainees have been awarded three-year fellowships through a newly established program, the Michael Brown Penn-GSK Postdoctoral Fellowship Award Program from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in partnership with GlaxoSmithKline.

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8-Aug-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698742

This small molecule could hold the key to promising HIV treatments

Cornell University

New research provides details of how the structure of the HIV-1 virus is assembled, findings that offer potential new targets for treatment.

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8-Aug-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698743

Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies Program Receives $2 Million Gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to Support Scientists in Training

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has received a $2 million gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to establish the Blavatnik Family Fellowship in Biomedical Research in the Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies (BGS) program.

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8-Aug-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698707

Mount Sinai Researchers Create RNA and DNA-Sequencing Platform to Match Broader Swath of Cancer Drugs to Patients With Few Options

Mount Sinai Health System

A comprehensive RNA and DNA sequencing platform benefits late-stage and drug-resistant multiple myeloma patients by determining which drugs would work best for them, according to results from a clinical trial published in JCO Precision Oncology in August.

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8-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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    8-Aug-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698603

Scientists Develop a Way to Monitor Cellular Decision Making

Harvard Medical School

Scientists have designed a way to monitor cellular decision making by measuring the rate of RNA change over time. RNA is the “interpreter” or “decoder” of genetic instructions that tell cells how much of which protein to make. The new method is an algorithm that quantifies changes in various RNA markers—the molecular footprints of a cell’s past and present and an indicator of its future, providing clues about what the cell is trying to become. The approach sets the stage for understanding cellular behavior during human development and may offer a way to rapidly monitor how cells respond to medications and other treatments.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 12:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Aug-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698611

Cancer Cells Send Out “Drones” to Battle Immune System from Afar

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Checkpoint inhibitor therapies have made metastatic melanoma and other cancers a survivable condition for 20 to 30 percent of treated patients, but clinicians have had very limited ways of knowing which patients will respond. Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism by which tumors suppress the immune system. Their findings also usher in the possibility that a straightforward blood test could predict and monitor cancer patients’ response to immunotherapy.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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    8-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698538

Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs) form an essential line of defense against enteric bacteria

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Mice deficient in innate lymphoid cells are vulnerable to lethal infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), which causes some forms of food poisoning. Moreover, activation by a cytokine called LIGHT, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, is necessary for ILCs to mount an anti-bacterial response.

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6-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698671

New Research Pinpoints Pathways Ebola Virus Uses to Enter Cells

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

A new study at Texas Biomedical Research Institute is shedding light on the role of specific proteins that trigger a mechanism allowing Ebola virus to enter cells to establish replication.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698654

FAU Scientist Receives $708,044 from Florida Department of Health for Cancer Metastasis Research

Florida Atlantic University

A leading scientist has been working to identify what contributes to the ability of tumor cells to move through the body and find other places to “set up shop.” He has identified a number of enzymes that he believes are responsible for this process and is working to develop novel compounds to slow down this spreading aspect of cancer.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698674

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Researchers Using Big Data to Predict Immunotherapy Responses

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In the age of Big Data, cancer researchers are discovering new ways to monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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