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Science

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Energy, Environment, Fundamental Science, Emissions, Chemistry, Catalysis

New Catalyst Meets Challenge of Cleaning Exhaust From Modern Engines

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News Release RICHLAND, Wash. — As cars become more fuel-efficient, less heat is wasted in the exhaust, which makes it harder to clean up the pollutants are emitted. But researchers have recently created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines. Their work, published this week in Science magazine, a leading peer-reviewed research journal, presents a new way to create a more powerful catalyst while using smaller amounts of platinum, the most expensive component of emission-control catalysts.

Medicine

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Brain, Glutamate, Receptor, Albert Lau, Neurotransmitter

Johns Hopkins Scientists Chart How Brain Signals Connect to Neurons

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical’s pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, Physical Review B, Louisiana State University, Magnet, Magnetic, Magnetism, Magnets, skyrmions, skyrmion, material design, Design, Vortex, vortex behavior, chemical pressure, Magnetic memory, spin

Chemical “Pressure” Tuning Magnetic Properties

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Unexpectedly, a little chemical substitution stabilizes unusual magnetic phase of vortexes called skyrmions.

Science

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Scientists at the Forefront of Understanding Exposure Risks and Leading Innovations in Toxicology Research Recognized with 2018 SOT Awards

Through its awards, SOT honors more than two dozen groundbreaking scientists, emerging leaders, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students who are advancing the science of toxicology. The SOT Awards also recognize the contributions of educators and science communicators as they work to encourage students to pursue STEM careers and improve public understanding of the connection between scientific research and public health.

Science

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Creating Surfaces That Repel Water and Control Its Flow (Video)

To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it’s pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science

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Plants

Bringing ‘Avatar’-Like Glowing Plants to the Real World

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The 2009 film “Avatar” created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report in ACS’ journal Nano Letters a way to infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.

Science

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Antibacterial, Nanotechnology, nanotexturing, stainless steel, Electrochemical, mammalian cell, surface properties

Nanotexturing Creates Bacteria-Killing Spikes on Stainless Steel Surfaces

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By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteria while not harming mammalian cells. If additional research supports early test results, the process might be used to attack microbial contamination on implantable medical devices and on food processing equipment made with the metal.

Science

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Perking Up and Crimping the ‘Bristles’ of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

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A molecular-sized brush that looks like a shoe brush has properties with great potential for the materials industry and medicine, but polyelectrolyte brushes can be sensitive, and getting them to work right tricky. New research shows what can make them break down, but also what can get them to systematically recover.

Science

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San Diego, Amyloid, tafamidis, Biochemistry

Jeffery Kelly Elected to National Academy of Inventors

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Jeffery Kelly, Ph.D., co-chair of the Department of Molecular Medicine at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has been named a fellow of the esteemed National Academy of Inventors (NAI), the organization announced today.

Science

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Cancer, killer t cells, Immune System, Infection, Immune Cells, Nature (magazine)

Scientists Identify Promising New Approach for Immune System Defense Against Cancer

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Researchers have identified a promising new strategy to fight infections and cancer. They uncovered a novel function for a protein known as “Runx3” that is key to the development of killer T cells—immune cells important for fighting infections and cancer.







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