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Infectious Diseases

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Sepsis: The Body’s Deadly Response to Infection

Although not as well-known as other medical conditions, sepsis kills more people in the United States than AIDS, breast cancer, or prostate cancer combined. Sepsis is body-wide inflammation, usually triggered by an overwhelming immune response to infection. Though doctors and medical staff are well-aware of the condition—it is involved in 1 in 10 hospital deaths—the condition is notoriously hard to diagnose. In this video, sepsis expert Sarah Dunsmore, a program director with the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), describes what sepsis is and how to recognize it, what kinds of patients are most at risk, and what NIGMS is doing to reduce the impact of this deadly condition.

Medicine

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Pediatrics, Pediatrician, Pediatric Surgery, pediatric neurological surgery, pediatric orthopedic surgery, pediatric orthopaedic surgery, post-operative fever

Early Postoperative Fever in Pediatric Patients Rarely Associated With an Infectious Source

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Post-operative fevers in children are rarely due to infection, yet they are often subjected to non-targeted testing. This conclusion has been widely recognized in adult patients undergoing surgery, but this is the first large-scale study to verify this finding in children.

Medicine

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Inflamation, Lloyd Miller, Dermatology

How the Skin Becomes Inflamed

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Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.

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Law and Public Policy

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Rural Health, Healthcare, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National 4-H Council, Appalachia, Health Disparities, Racial Disparities, Prevention, Health Policy

Closing the Rural Health Gap: Media Update from RWJF and Partners on Rural Health Disparities

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Rural counties continue to rank lowest among counties across the U.S., in terms of health outcomes. A group of national organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National 4-H Council are leading the way to close the rural health gap.

Medicine

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c. diff, C. Difficile, Clostridium Difficile

After Repeated C. diff Infections, People Change Their Behaviors

After suffering repeated bouts of debilitating Clostridium difficile infections, many patients significantly change their behaviors, but some precautions may do little to prevent future infections, according to a first-of-its-kind study.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, World Aids Day, Cardiovascular Disease, Chronic Kidney Disease, Heart, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Kidney Disease

HIV Patients at Greater Risk of Both Heart and Kidney Disease

HIV patients and their doctors are urged to be more aware of the additional health risks associated with treated HIV infection. This follows new research that shows HIV patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially greater risk for chronic kidney disease and vice versa.

Medicine

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Multidrug Resistance, Gram Negative Bacteria, Colombia, Antibiotic Resistance

Study Outlines ‘Perfect Storm’ That Led to Colombia’s Antibiotic Resistance Epidemic

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The nearly simultaneous emergence of a gene responsible for producing carbapenemases - enzymes that kill the most powerful antibiotics used against life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections - coupled with the introduction of a bacterial clone that spread between patients created the “perfect storm” that led to today’s antibiotic resistance epidemic in Colombia.

Medicine

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Hepatitis B, Hepatitis B research, HBV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), Primate Research, nonhuman primates

Promising New Drug for Hepatitis B Tested First at Texas Biomedical Research Institute’s National Primate Research Center in San Antonio

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Research at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) on the campus of Texas Biomedical Research Institute helped advance a new treatment now in human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

Medicine

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Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis, seasonal allergi, Allergies, Acaai

Two Meds Not Always Better than One for Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

n a newly updated clinical practice guideline, allergists offer practical advice on the best types and amounts of medications to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis.

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Penn Study Pinpoints H3N2 Mutation in Last Year’s Flu Vaccine as Responsible for Lowered Efficacy

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The below average efficacy of last year’s influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not have immunity against H3N2 viruses that circulated last year.







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