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Science

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Renewable Energy, Engineering, Nano Device, nanotechnnology, Audio

How Scientists Turned a Flag Into a Loudspeaker

A paper-thin, flexible device created at Michigan State University not only can generate energy from human motion, it can act as a loudspeaker and microphone as well, nanotechnology researchers report in the May 16 edition of Nature Communications.

Science

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stretchable electronics, transient electronics, bioresorbable electronics, Advanced Materials, Nanoparticles

Laser Printing with Nanoparticles Holds Promise for Medical Research

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Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own – known as “bioresorbable” electronics – are envisioned by many as one of medical technology’s next frontiers. A new study by Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers suggests that a laser printing technique using nanoparticles could help unlock a more cost-effective approach to building sturdier and safer components.

Science

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nanotechnnology, strontium niobate, Plasmon, photocatalytic

Strontium Niobate Demystified: NUS-Led Research Teams Uncover Extraordinary Properties of the Semiconductor Material

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Researchers from the National University of Singapore recently uncovered novel properties of strontium niobate, which is a unique semiconductor material that displays both metallic type conduction and photocatalytic activity.

Science

Channels:

Photonics, Nanophotonics, Transducers, Fiber Optics, Atomic Force Microscopy, Optical Tweezers, Bioactivity

Nano Fiber Feels Forces and Hears Sounds Made by Cells

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Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a nano-sized optical fiber that’s sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells. The fiber detects forces down to 160 femtonewtons and sound levels down to -30 decibels.

Science

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triboelectric nanogenerator, Teng, energy-harvesting, body motion, Wearable Technology, Energy, Kyung-Eun Byun, Min-Hyun Lee, Yeonchoo Cho, Seung-Geol Nam, Hyeon-Jin Shin, Seongjun Park, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, APL Materials

Can the Motion of Checking Your Smartwatch Charge It?

Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are small devices that convert movement into electricity, and might just be what bring us into an era of energy-harvesting clothes and implants. But could TENGs, even theoretically, give us wearable electronics powered solely by the wearer’s day-to-day body motion? The short answer is yes. New research published this week in APL Materials demonstrates the ability of mechanical energy produced by typical body motions to power a watch or smartphone.

Science

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Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology, Nanoparticle, platinum catalysts, Nanotube, Materials Science & Engineering, Chemistry & Materials

Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University Scientists Develop More Efficient Catalytic Material for Fuel Cell Applications

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Scientists at Ames Laboratory have discovered a method for making smaller, more efficient intermetallic nanoparticles for fuel cell applications, and which also use less of the expensive precious metal platinum.

Science

Channels:

Advanced Photon Source (APS), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), Environment, Biology, Structural Biology, Materials Science, Nanoscience, Synchrotron Radiation

Argonne Welcomes Scientists to Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials User Meeting

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More than 400 researchers from numerous disciplines will convene at Argonne today for the annual Users’ Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials.

Medicine

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Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Pharmaceucticals, Drugs and treatment, Precision Medicine

A Slingshot to Shoot Drugs Onto the Site of an Infection

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Chemists from Italy and Canada specializing in nanotechnology create a molecular slingshot that could shoot drugs at precise locations in the human body once triggered by specific disease markers.

Medicine

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Synchrotron Radiation, Nanoscience, materials simulation & theory, Modeling, simulation, & visualization, Advanced Photon Source (APS), Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

X-Ray Imaging and Computer Modeling Help Map Electric Properties of Nanomaterials

Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

Science

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Discovery of New Transparent Thin Film Material Could Improve Electronics and Solar Cells

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A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells.







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