Feature Channels:

Nanotechnology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Optics, Photonics, Light, light propagation, Waveguides, Nanotechnology, Signal Processing, Optical Communication

Columbia Engineers Invent Method to Control Light Propagation in Waveguides

Yu-NatureNanotechimageFig2.png

Columbia Engineering Professor Nanfang Yu has invented a method to control light propagating in confined pathways, or waveguides, with high efficiency by using nano-antennas. He built photonic integrated devices that had record-small footprints and were also able to maintain optimal performance over an unprecedented broad wavelength range. His method could lead to faster, more powerful, and more efficient optical chips, which in turn could transform optical communications and optical signal processing. (Nature Nanotechnology 4/17)

Science

Channels:

nanotechnnology, Neurobiology, silicidation, Drug Screening Technology

'Neuron-Reading' Nanowires Could Accelerate Development of Drugs to Treat Neurological Diseases

Image43_color.jpg

A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The new nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Nanoparticles, Drug Delivery Systems, Brain Injury

A Simple Sniff

A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis has combined nanoparticles, aerosol science and locusts in new proof-of-concept research that could someday vastly improve drug delivery to the brain, making it as simple as a sniff.

Science

Channels:

Materials Science, Nanoscience, Surface & interface studies, Advanced Photon Source (APS)

Self-Assembling Polymers Provide Thin Nanowire Template

block-copolymer-art-900px.jpg

In a recent study, a team of researchers from Argonne, the University of Chicago and MIT has developed a new way to create some of the world’s thinnest wires, using a process that could enable mass manufacturing with standard types of equipment.

Science

Channels:

DNA, genomic mapping , nanochannels, DNA knots, Genomes, Sequence, base pairs, Aashish Jain, Kevin D. Dorfman, University of Minnesota, BioNano Genomics, Biomicrofluidics

What’s a Knot -- and What’s Not -- in Genomic Mapping

BMF-Dorfman-nanochannel.jpg

Genome mapping complements DNA sequencing, offering insight into huge, intact molecules between 150,000 and 1 million base pairs in length. Obtaining measurements of such large segments is not without its challenges, but new research into the physics of nanochannel mapping published this week in the journal Biomicrofluidics, may help overcome a (literal) knot in the process and advance genome mapping technology.

Medicine

Channels:

liquid biopsy, Nanoprobes, Cancer Diagnosis, extracellular vesicles

Fast Capture of Cancer Markers Will Aid in Diagnosis and Treatment

final2-jpg.jpg

Researchers at Penn State have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate rare markers in blood for potential development of precision cancer diagnosis and personalized anticancer treatments.

Science

Channels:

super resolution microscopy, Diffraction Limit, Nano Imaging

NUS Engineers Develop Novel Lens for Super-Resolution Imaging

Photo.jpg

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has developed a novel lens for super-resolution imaging which breaks resolution limitations in microscopy and has potential applications in high precision failure inspection and biological research.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Nanoparticles, Leukocyte, leukosome, protein corona formation, Cardiovascular Disease, Autoimmune Disease, Cancer Therapy, Regenerative Medicine

Tailoring Nanoparticles to Evade Immune Cells and Prevent Inflammatory Response

2017ACSNano-Leukosome.jpg

A Houston Methodist-led research team showed that the systemic administration of nanoparticles triggers an inflammatory response because of blood components accumulating on their surface.

Science

Channels:

Viscosity, viscous fingering, Fluids, Fluid Dynamics, porous media, fluid stability, micromixing, Nanoparticles, nanofluids, Behnam Dastvareh, Jalel Azaiez, University of Calgary, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

How Nanoparticles Affect Flow Through Porous Stuff in Surprising Ways

POF-Dastvareh-fingers-fluid.jpg

Viscous fingering occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface. Such instabilities are encountered in a wide variety of fields. Understanding different aspects of this phenomenon, and the variables that can control things like instabilities and velocity distribution dynamics, can potentially offer options to control and utilize these effects more effectively. Researchers report their findings in this week’s Physics of Fluids.

Science

Channels:

Software, Open Source, nanotechnnology, 3-D images

Open-Source Software Unlocks 3-D View of Nanomaterials

Now it's possible for anyone to see and share 3-D nanoscale imagery with a new open-source software platform developed by researchers at the University of Michigan, Cornell University and open-source software company Kitware Inc.







Chat now!