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Article ID: 691688

Lung Transplant Drug Enters Human Testing After Decades of Work

University of Virginia Health System

The drug, regadenoson, is already commonly used to image cardiac patients’ hearts. But the UVA research suggests it could be put to another, lifesaving purpose.

Released:
26-Mar-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 667700

Health Disparities Narrow, Cardio vs. Resistance, Fruit Fly Famines, and More in the Obesity News Source

Newswise

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Released:
23-Mar-2018 2:50 PM EDT
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    22-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 691271

Boosting Enzyme May Help Improve Blood Flow, Fitness in Elderly

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A well-studied enzyme called SIRT1 declines in the blood vessels with age and restoring it reverses the effects of vascular aging in mice. After receiving a supplement called NMN, older mice showed increased capillary density, blood flow, mobility, and endurance

Released:
16-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 691242

Scientists Pinpoint Cause of Vascular Aging in Mice

Harvard Medical School

-Scientists identify mechanism behind vascular aging, muscle demise in mice. -Treatment with chemical compounds reversed vascular aging, stimulated blood vessel growth and blood flow, boosted exercise capacity in aging animals. -Findings set the stage for therapies in humans to stave off a range of conditions linked to vascular aging.

Released:
15-Mar-2018 6:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691536

Technology, Expertise and Collaboration Are Key in Quality Cardiovascular Care

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

People with heart and vascular conditions have benefited from technologies and treatments introduced in recent years. But traditional qualities such as expertise and teamwork are essential in making the most effective use of new products and procedures, says David Zhao, M.D., chief of cardiovascular medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Released:
22-Mar-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691491

Western Diet Depletes Artery-Protecting Immune Cells

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

New research from scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology shows how a diet high in fat and cholesterol depletes the ranks of artery-protecting immune cells, turning them into promoters of inflammation, which exacerbate atherosclerotic plaque buildup that occurs in cardiovascular disease. The team has also found that high density lipoproteins (HDL)—more commonly known as “good cholesterol”—counteract this process, helping the protective immune cells maintain their identity and keep arteries clear.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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    20-Mar-2018 1:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 691420

Scott & White Medical Center Selected as Patient Navigator Program: Focus MI Diplomat Hospital

Baylor Scott and White Health

Scott & White Medical Center – Temple, part of Baylor Scott & White, is one of 15 U.S. hospitals selected to participate in the American College of Cardiology Patient Navigator Program: Focus MI Quality Campaign as a “Diplomat Hospital.” This is an expanded version of the original Patient Navigator Program launched in 2013. Scott & White – Temple was one of 35 pioneering hospitals chosen to provide personalized services to heart disease patients to help them avoid a quick return to the hospital.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 8:45 AM EDT
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    20-Mar-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691321

Limiting Work Shifts for Medical Trainees Affects Satisfaction, But Not Educational Outcomes

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Limiting first-year medical residents to 16-hour work shifts, compared to “flexing” them to allow for some longer shifts, generally makes residents more satisfied with their training and work-life balance, but their training directors more dissatisfied with curtailed educational opportunities. That’s one conclusion of a new study published online March 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 9:55 AM EDT
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    19-Mar-2018 1:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 691315

Oral Micronized Progesterone May Decrease Perimenopausal Hot Flashes, Night Sweats

Endocrine Society

Oral micronized progesterone (OMP) may diminish hot flashes and night sweats in perimenopausal women, new research from Canada reports. The results will be presented on Monday, March 19 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.

Released:
18-Mar-2018 1:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691368

Quintupling Inhaler Medication May Not Prevent Asthma Attacks in Children

Case Western Reserve University

Children with mild to moderate asthma do not benefit from a common practice of increasing their inhaled steroids at the first signs of an asthma exacerbation, according to clinical trial results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers found short-term increases in inhaled steroids did not prevent attacks in children aged 5 to 11, and may even slow a child’s growth.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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