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Article ID: 694307

Hurricane Experts Available to Provide Analysis Throughout the Season

Florida State University

Released:
9-May-2018 4:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694287

Caterpillar ‘Road Rage’ Could Affect Migration

University of Georgia

Monarch butterfly caterpillars living next to roads may be stressed by the sound of passing cars and trucks, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Released:
9-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694211

Powerful Hurricanes Strengthen Faster Now Than 30 Years Ago

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Hurricanes that intensify rapidly – a characteristic of almost all powerful hurricanes – do so more strongly and quickly now than they did 30 years ago, according to a study published recently in Geophysical Research Letters. The phenomenon is due largely to a climate cycle known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

Released:
9-May-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694219

Migratory Animals Carry More Parasites, Says Study

University of Georgia

Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.

Released:
8-May-2018 3:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694200

Scientists Can Measure Population Change Through Chemicals Found in Feces

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Fecal stanols – organic molecules – located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes, according to new research by faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York

Released:
8-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694182

Volcanic Eruption Impacts Environment and Economy, Raises Questions About Zoning and Development, Says University of Redlands Professor Nicholas Reksten

University of Redlands

Released:
7-May-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694149

SimEarth

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne joins its sister national laboratories in powering a new earth modeling system with supercomputers. The system features weather-scale resolution and can help researchers anticipate decadal-scale changes that could influence the U.S. energy sector in years to come.

Released:
7-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694161

Stomata — the Plant Pores That Give Us Life — Arise Thanks to a Gene Called MUTE, Scientists Report

University of Washington

New research in plants shows that a gene called MUTE is required for the formation of stomata — the tiny pores that a critical for gas exchange, including releasing the oxygen gas that we breathe.

Released:
7-May-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693926

Earth’s Orbital Changes Have Influenced Climate, Life Forms For at Least 215 Million Years

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Every 405,000 years, gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Venus slightly elongate Earth’s orbit, an amazingly consistent pattern that has influenced our planet’s climate for at least 215 million years and allows scientists to more precisely date geological events like the spread of dinosaurs, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings are published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
7-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694152

Geoscientists Suggest ‘Snowball Earth’ Resulted from Plate Tectonics

University of Texas at Dallas

In a new study published in the April issue of the journal Terra Nova, geologists at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Austin suggest that episodes of global cooling that geologists refer to as “Snowball Earth” can be linked to the advent of plate tectonics.

Released:
7-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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