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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Walking, Heart, Heart Health, Heart Disease, America, Walking Exercise, Exercise, Fitness, Workout, Moderate Exercise, Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, Weight, Nursing, Binghamton University, Binghamto, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Aerobic, Steps, Pedometer, Cardio, cardiovascuar health, Women, Rural, New York

Regular Walking Regimen Can Improve Heart Health

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Heart disease, the leading cause of death in America, can be combatted by implementing a simple walking regimen. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York found that moderately intensive walking improves cardiovascular risk factors in the short term.

Medicine

Channels:

Heart Failure, Cardiology, Defibrillator, Defibrillation, Heart, Heart Disease

New Sensor System Predicts Heart Failure Events

A suite of sensors can predict heart failure events by detecting when a patient’s condition is worsening, according to Dr. John Boehmer, professor of medicine, Penn State College of Medicine.

Medicine

Channels:

dilated cardiomyopathy, Gene Mutation, Cardio Vascular Disease

Gene Study Finds Hearts 'Primed to Fail'

Around 1 per cent of the population carry a gene which could mean they have hearts ‘primed to fail’.

Medicine

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Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Regeneration, Gene Editing, Cardiovascular Health, Ut Southwestern

UT Southwestern’s Dr. Eric Olson Recognized for Cutting-Edge Research Into Regenerative Medicine and Mentoring of Future Leaders

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Dr. Eric Olson, Director of the Hamon Center and Chairman of Molecular Biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, was recognized nationally and locally for his academic mentoring prowess, along with his pioneering research into tissue regeneration and gene editing.

Medicine

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Tighter Blood Pressure Control May Save More Than 100,000 Lives Each Year in the U.S.

• New research estimates the projected lives that would be saved if patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease underwent intensive blood pressure lowering. • The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15–20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, American Heart Association, Cardiology, Vascular

Mount Sinai Cardiologists Honored at American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, and Jeffrey W. Olin, DO, FAHA, Professor of Cardiology and Director of the Vascular Medicine and Vascular Diagnostics Laboratory at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, received awards at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions, November 12-16, 2016.

Medicine

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Xenobiology, Xenotransplant Program, Xenotransplantation, Xenotransplant, CRISPR, CRISPR knockout, CRISP/Cas9, Kidney, Kidney Transplant, Kidney Transplant Rejection, Kidney Transplantation, Kidney Transplants, Heart Surgery

David Cooper, World Renowned Xenotransplantation Researcher, Joins UAB

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Cooper will join Joseph Tector as co-director of UAB’s Xenotransplantation Program with their research geared toward using genetically modified pigs to facilitate kidney transplants in humans.

Medicine

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Reducing Salt Intake May Help Protect Kidney Patients’ Heart and Kidney Health

• In patients with chronic kidney disease, dietary sodium restriction reduced albuminuria (an indicator of kidney dysfunction) and blood pressure, whereas paricalcitol (a vitamin D receptor activator) in itself had no significant effect on these measures. • The combination of paricalcitol and a low sodium diet resulted in the lowest albuminuria levels in patients.

Medicine

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Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Heart Failure, Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Omega 6 Fatty Acids, Inflammation, Lipid signaling, Resolvins, Metabolipidomics

How a Mediterranean-Style Diet May Reduce Heart Failure in the Aged

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In mouse experiments, researchers have shown how aging and excess dietary fat create signals that lead to heart failure after a heart attack. Clarifying the mechanism of this harmful pathway is important because nearly 5 million people in the United States suffer heart failure as an age-related disease following heart attacks.

Medicine

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology, Cardiologists, payment reform, ACA, Healthcare Reform, Fee-for-service, JAMA, JAMA Cardiology

GW Researcher Publishes Review of New Payment Reforms in JAMA Cardiology

As conventional fee-for-service models become less viable, cardiologists will need to participate in emerging payment models, according to a review published by GW researcher Steven Farmer, M.D., Ph.D., in the Journal of the American Medical Association Cardiology.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiac, Heart Failure, columbia university med, Newyork Presbyterian, American Heart Association, New England Journal Of Medicine, Medical Device, Left Ventricular Assist Device

Study Shows Newer Generation LVAD Is Associated with Better Outcomes for Heart Failure Patients at 6 Months

A newer generation left ventricular assist device (LVAD) provides better outcomes for patients with advanced heart failure at six months compared to its predecessor, according to a new study. Researchers presented data from the MOMENTUM 3 trial at the 2016 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association and also co-published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Medicine

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Saint Louis University, SLUCare, paul hauptman, Heart Failure, Generic Drugs

SLU Research: Wide Variability in Generic Heart Failure Drugs Can Make Them Unaffordable to Uninsured Patients

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New research from Saint Louis University finds that the prices for commonly used generic heart failure drugs varies widely.

Medicine

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precision health, Precision Medicine, Personalized Medicine, Precision Medicine Initiative, Heart Attack, Cardiovascular, Smartphone, Wearable, California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, predictive blood biomarkers

Cedars-Sinai Researchers Receive $1.2 Million Grant From California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine

Cedars-Sinai health investigators will use a $1.2 million grant from a state precision medicine initiative to design a system using remote monitoring to predict heart attacks and other cardiovascular events. In this study, the research team will look for the earliest signs of cardiovascular disease by monitoring patients remotely with a specialized watch that measures activity, sleep, heart rate and stress levels.

Medicine

Channels:

atrial fibrillation (AF), Dementia, intermountain medical center, American Heart Association, american heart association scientific sessions, Warfarin, Blood Clots, Medication, Heart Patients, Research & Development, Cardiovascular Research, intermountain healthcare, Jared Bunch, MD

Atrial Fibrillation Patients Are at Increased Risk of Dementia, Regardless of Anticoagulation Use

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Atrial fibrillation patients who use the drug, warfarin, to prevent harmful blood clots from forming in their hearts to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than patients who use warfarin for non-atrial fibrillation conditions, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.

Medicine

Channels:

Vascular, Cardiovascular, Heart, Transplants, Stem Cells

Morgridge–UW Project Investigates Tissue-Engineered Arteries for Transplant

The prospect of creating artery “banks” available for cardiovascular surgery, bypassing the need to harvest vessels from the patient, could transform treatment of many common heart and vascular ailments. But it’s a big leap from concept to reality.

Medicine

Channels:

Atrial Fibrillation, Stroke, Blood Clots, Irregular Heart Beat, Anticoagulant, American Heart Association, heart and stroke, Blood Thinners

Half of Hospitalized Atrial Fibrillation Patients Don’t Receive Critical Medications

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When patients suffer from atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat, they are at considerably higher risk for blood clots and stroke. However, when hospitalized, half of these patients do not receive medications that could help prevent such complications, according to research being presented Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Medicine

Channels:

Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Atrial Fibrillation, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

BIDMC Study in NEJM Reports Progress in Preventing Bleeding in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Undergoing Stenting

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A new study led by clinician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) testing the safety and effectiveness of anticoagulant strategies for patients with atrial fibrillation who undergo stenting procedures has shown that therapies combining the anticoagulant drug rivaroxaban with either single or dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) were more effective in preventing bleeding complications than the current standard of care.

Medicine

Channels:

Coronary Calcium Scanning, Coronary Calcium, Stroke, Heart Attack, Heart Imaging, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthca, American Heart Association, Stress Test, heart blockage

New Study Finds Cardiac PET/CT Imaging Effective in Detecting Calcium Blockages, Assessing Heart Attack Risk

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Many people who experience chest pain but don’t have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test comes back negative for blockages in their blood vessels. But a new study by cardiac researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found they may not be off the hook after all.

Science

Channels:

cardiovascuar disease, Vascular Dementia, Kidney Disease, Proton Pump Inhibitor, PPIs, American Heart Association, Heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux, GERD

Houston Methodist Researcher Recognized by AHA’s Circulation Research Editorial Board

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Research published by a Houston Methodist team led by John Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., received high accolades at this year’s American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Medicine

Channels:

Robotics, Robotic Surgery, Otolarygology, Urology, Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine, Obgyn, Surgery, Tech, Health, Cardiology

Mount Sinai Establishes Robotics Institute (MSRI)

Pioneering Surgeons Have Been on the Forefront of Robotic Surgery Techniques for Nearly 20 Years







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