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Article ID: 608435

New Drug Candidate Found for Deadly Fungal Lung Infections

Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

On a molecular level, you have more in common with shower curtain mold or the mushrooms on your pizza than you might think. Humans and fungi share similar proteins, a biological bond that makes curing fungal infections difficult and expensive. Now for the first time in 20 years, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have discovered a new compound that could be developed as an antifungal drug to treat histoplasmosis and cryptococcosis, two types of fungal infections that are naturally drug-resistant.

Released:
7-Oct-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 608545

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Researchers Awarded Nearly $2.5M to Examine Ways to Block Cancer Cell Growth

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

A pair of researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey has been awarded nearly $2.5 million dollars from the National Institutes of Health to further study in their respective laboratories. X.F. Steven Zheng, PhD, was awarded $1.65 million to examine an activating mechanism of the mTOR protein, which is a central controller of cell growth and metabolism. Darren R. Carpizo, MD, PhD, was awarded nearly $800,000 to further explore the effects of a compound identified in Dr. Carpizo’s laboratory found to restore tumor suppressor function of a mutated p53 gene in cancer cells.

Released:
7-Oct-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Oct-2013 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608478

Massive DNA Study Points to New Heart Drug Targets and a Key Role for Triglycerides

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A global hunt for genes that influence heart disease risk has uncovered 157 changes in human DNA that alter the levels of cholesterol and other blood fats – a discovery that could lead to new medications.

Released:
3-Oct-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 608562

Researchers Discover New Therapeutic Agents That May Benefit Leukemia Patients

Indiana University

An Indiana University cancer researcher and his colleagues have discovered new therapeutic targets and drugs for certain types of leukemia or blood cancer.

Released:
4-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-Oct-2013 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608442

Possible Culprits in Congenital Heart Defects Identified

Washington University in St. Louis

Mitochondria are the power plants of cells, manufacturing fuel so a cell can perform its many tasks. These cellular power plants also are well known for their role in cell suicide. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Padua-Dulbecco Telethon Institute in Italy have shown that mitochondria remarkably also orchestrate events that determine a cell’s future, at least in the embryonic mouse heart. The new study identifies new potential genetic culprits in the origins of some congenital heart defects.

Released:
2-Oct-2013 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-Oct-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 608396

Rett Syndrome Gene Dysfunction Redefined

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Whitehead Institute researchers have discovered that the protein product of the gene MECP2, which is mutated in about 95% of Rett syndrome patients, is a global activator of neuronal gene expression. Mutations in the protein can cause decreased gene transcription, reduced protein synthesis, and severe defects in the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

Released:
1-Oct-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608491

CHOP Genetics Expert Co-Leads NIH Grant on Psychiatric Illness in Patients with Deletion Syndrome

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Genetics experts from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are among the leaders of a major international collaboration researching why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a higher risk of schizophrenia.

Released:
3-Oct-2013 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 608383

Tests in Mice Identify Compound That May Keep Survivors of Ruptured Brain Aneurysms From Later Succumbing to Stroke

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers, working with mice, say they have identified a chemical compound that reduces the risk of dangerous, potentially stroke-causing blood vessel spasms that often occur after the rupture of a bulging vessel in the brain.

Released:
1-Oct-2013 1:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608377

Researchers Identify Traffic Cop for Meiosis—with Implications for Fertility and Birth Defects

New York University

Researchers at NYU and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have identified the mechanism that plays “traffic cop” in meiosis. Their findings shed new light on fertility and may lead to greater understanding of the factors that lead to birth defects.

Released:
1-Oct-2013 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 608348

Answering a Nanotube Question: “Waviness” Explains Why Carbon Nanotube Forests Have Low Stiffness

Georgia Institute of Technology

A new study has found that “waviness” in forests of carbon nanotubes dramatically reduces their stiffness. Instead of being a detriment, the waviness may make the nanotube arrays more useful as thermal interface material for conducting heat away from integrated circuits.

Released:
30-Sep-2013 8:00 PM EDT
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