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Dr. Keith Reeves, The Methodist Hospital in Houston, swine , Dr. Keith Reeves, The Methodist Hospital in Houston, swine flu, H1N

Swine Flu: What Pregnant Women Need to Know

How swine flu can affect pregnant women.

Medicine

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Pandemic, Emergency Medicine, Vaccines, Influenza, Public Health, Emerging Diseases, Stress, Anxiety

UAB Experts on H1N1 Swine Flu

From a working member of the H1N1 influenza working group of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) to an expert in disease surveillance for travelers and migrants, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has several experts who can address the spread of swine flu.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, Tropical Medicine, Public Health, Epidemiology, Unc Chapel Hill School Of Medicine, UNC Department of Family Medicine, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

Insecticide-treated Bed Nets Reduce Infant Deaths in Democratic Republic of Congo

Giving insecticide-treated bed nets to nearly 18,000 mothers at prenatal clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo prevented an estimated 414 infant deaths from malaria, a study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers concludes.

Business

Medicine

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Flu Shot, Vaccination, Mandatory, Swine Flu, H1N1

Should Flu Shots be Mandatory for Hospital Employees?

WheltonFluShot2.JPG

Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly recommends that all healthcare workers receive seasonal flu shots, only about 40 percent do so. Now some infectious diseases experts and hospitals say flu shots should be mandatory.

Science

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unintentional injury, Mortality Rate

Deaths from Unintentional Injuries Increase for Many Groups

While the total mortality rate from unintentional injury increased in the U.S. by 11 percent from 1999-2005, far larger increases were seen in some subgroups analyzed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Their analysis found that white women between 45 and 64 years old experienced a 230 percent increase in the rate of poisoning mortality over the study period. White men in this age group experienced an increase of 137 percent.

Medicine

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H1N1, H1N1 pandemic flu virus, Diagnostics, Genetics, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Research & Development, Molecular Biology

AMP President Updates CDC Committee on H1N1 Testing

Dr. Jan Nowak reports community molecular pathologists’ efforts to confirm suspected cases of H1N1 influenza early in the outbreak and discussed the challenges encountered by the diagnostic community and opportunities to improve access to high quality rapid diagnostic tests for pandemic influenza.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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H1N1, flu, Cold And Flu Season

Don’t Catch Cold or Flu, Catch a Webinar to Stay Healthy

The Soap and Detergent Association (SDA – www.cleaning101.com) is hosting a webinar at no cost on September 24, 2009 to help community leaders prepare for cold and flu season.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Neurlogy, AAN, Neurology Journal, journal Neuro, Infection, Inflamation, Dementia, Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease

Infections May Lead to Faster Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease

Getting a cold, stomach bug or other infection may lead to increased memory loss in people with Alzheimer’s disease, according to research published in the September 8, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Sleep, Fatigue, Workplace Safety, Work Injury, work

Daylight Saving Time Leads to Less Sleep, More Injuries on the Job

Every March, most Americans welcome the switch to daylight saving time because of the longer days, but also dread losing an hour of sleep after they move their clocks forward. Now a new study shows that losing just an hour of sleep could pose some dangerous consequences for those in hazardous work environments.

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Patient Perception Is Vital When Reporting Medical Errors

When reporting medical errors, patients’ perceptions of their physicians’ disclosure may be key to gaining their trust, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. However, a positive perception of the disclosure has little effect on the lawsuit risk a physician faces.







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