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Science

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Influenza, Virology

Compound Found to Safely Counter Deadly Bird Flu

A study suggests that a new compound, one on the threshold of final testing in humans, may be more potent and safer for treating “bird flu” than the antiviral drug best known by the trade name Tamiflu.

Medicine

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How Flu Succeeds

Investigators have identified 295 human cell factors that influenza A strains must harness to infect a cell, including the currently circulating swine-origin H1N1.

Medicine

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H1N1 vaccine

One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine May Provide Sufficient Protection for Infants and Children

One dose of vaccine may be effective to protect infants and children and reduce transmission of the H1N1 virus, according to a study in JAMA, published online today because of its public health implications. The study will appear in the January 6 print edition of the journal.

Medicine

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Antibiotic, Dependent, Resistant Bacteria, Tubercolosis, Mdr Tb

Researchers Identify Tuberculosis Strain That Thrives on Antibiotic

Scientists have identified a strain of antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis that thrives in the presence of rifampin, a front-line drug in the treatment of tuberculosis. The researchers determined that the bacteria grew poorly in the absence of the antibiotic rifampin and better with it.

Medicine

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Public Health Concerns, Discrimination, 9-11, September 11, Arab American, Race And Ethnicity, Detroit, Muslim American, Chaldean, Emergency Medicine, General M, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

About 25 Percent of Arabs in Detroit Reported Post-9/11 Abuse

One quarter of Detroit-area Arab Americans reported personal or familial abuse because of race, ethnicity or religion since 9/11, leading to higher odds of adverse health effects, according to a new University of Michigan study.

Medicine

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American Journal of Public Health Highlights: February 2009

1) Having a Snack Attack: U.S. Obesity Epidemic Related to its Easy Accessibility in Retail Stores; 2) Arab-Americans Experienced Adverse Health Effects in the Sept. 11, 2001, Aftermath. (3) Multiple Deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan Adversely Affect Mental Health of U.S. Soldiers

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Hispanics, Disasters, Disaster Preparedness, Social Networks

Social Networks Help Hispanics Prepare for Disasters

Informal social networks are more effective than mailers and "media blitzes" at encouraging Hispanics to prepare for disasters.

Business

Medicine

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Edelman, Health Engagement

New Survey Shows Americans Look to Business to Improve Country’s Health

As the healthcare reform debate continues, legislators and businesspeople alike might be surprised to learn that Americans are looking not only to government but also to business to improve our nation’s health, even beyond employee wellness efforts. People are more likely to purchase from, recommend, and invest in companies that act on health issues—creating a compelling case for businesses to step up their efforts.

Medicine

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First Immunological Clue to Why Some H1N1 Patients Get Very Ill Or Die

An international team of Canadian and Spanish scientists have found the first potential immunological clue of why some people develop severe pneumonia when infected by the pandemic H1N1 virus.

Medicine

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H1N1, Seasonal Flu, Sickle Cell Disease

H1N1 More Risky than Seasonal Flu in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

Infection with the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, causes more life-threatening complications than seasonal flu in children with sickle cell disease, according to research from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. The findings, to be presented on Dec. 7 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, warn parents and caregivers that such children are more likely to need emergency treatment and stays in an intensive-care unit.







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