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Article ID: 568966

Stress Hormone Blocks Testosterone’s Effects

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

High levels of the stress hormone cortisol play a critical role in blocking testosterone's influence on competition and domination, according to new psychology research at The University of Texas at Austin.

Released:
29-Sep-2010 11:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 568853

Striding Towards a New Dawn for Electronics

McGill University

Conductive polymers are plastic materials with high electrical conductivity that promise to revolutionize a wide range of products including TV displays, solar cells, and biomedical sensors. A team of McGill University researchers have now reported how to visualize and study the process of energy transport along one single conductive polymer molecule at a time, a key step towards bringing these exciting new applications to market.

Released:
28-Sep-2010 7:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 568554

Demethylation Mechanism Pinpointed in APC Gene Mutants

University of Utah Health

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah demonstrate in a study featured today in Cell the mechanism by which mutation of the APC gene affects a cellular process known as DNA methylation.

Released:
20-Sep-2010 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Sep-2010 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 568469

Researchers Map Thousands of MAPK Protein Interactions

University of California San Diego Health

Investigators, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have mapped a huge network of protein interactions involving Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. Their study will be published in the advanced online edition of Nature Methods on September 19.

Released:
16-Sep-2010 8:30 AM EDT
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Cell Biology

Article ID: 568545

Tick Tock: Rods Help Set Internal Clocks, Biologist Says

Johns Hopkins University

Rod cells – one of three kinds of exquisitely photosensitive cells found in the retina of the eye – are surprisingly found to be the only ones responsible for “setting” our internal clocks in low light.

Released:
17-Sep-2010 3:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 568523

Molecule 968 Binds Glutaminase and Starves Cancer Cells

Cornell University

Researchers have long believed that starving cancer cells of glutamine, which cancer cells require in larger quantities than normal cells, would help fight some cancers. Now, they have discovered a molecule that does the job.

Released:
17-Sep-2010 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Sep-2010 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 568197

Nature Study Shows How Molecules Escape from the Nucleus

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

By constructing a microscope apparatus that achieves resolution never before possible in living cells, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have illuminated the molecular interactions that occur during one of the most important “trips” in all of biology: the journey of individual messenger Ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules from the nucleus into the cytoplasm (the area between the nucleus and cell membrane) so that proteins can be made.

Released:
13-Sep-2010 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 568250

Your Body Recycling Itself – Captured on Film

McGill University

Proteins are made up of a chain of amino acids, and scientists have known since the 1980s that first one in the chain determines the lifetime of a protein. McGill researchers have finally discovered how the cell identifies this first amino acid – and caught it on camera.

Released:
13-Sep-2010 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 568174

These Cells Are Fishy, But That’s A Good Thing

University of California San Diego Health

Scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified dendritic antigen-presenting cells in zebrafish, opening the possibility that the tiny fish could become a new model for studying the complexities of the human immune system.

Released:
7-Sep-2010 5:00 PM EDT
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Cell Biology

  • Embargo expired:
    7-Sep-2010 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 567980

A New Role for Insulin in Cell Survival, Cell Metabolism and Stress Response

Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Researchers at the Buck Institute for Age Research have discovered a novel way in which insulin affects cell metabolism and cell survival. Surprisingly the insulin signaling pathway, which is involved in aging, diabetes and stress response, is active at a deeper level of cell activity than scientists expected.

Released:
1-Sep-2010 8:00 AM EDT
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