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Medicine

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American Academy Of Neurology, American Psychiatric Association, American Academy Of Family Physicians, Reimbursment , Neurology, AAN, Neurologist, Neurologists

New Research Shows Physician Work Intensity Is Similar Among Specialties

Contrary to longstanding assumptions, new findings suggest the work intensity of physicians across several specialties is fairly equal. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology along with several other medical associations and published online ahead of print in the journal Medical Care, provides the groundwork for the development of a more reliable, scientific measurement of physician work intensity that may guide future national policy in patient safety, practice management and payment. The results represent the second phase of the two-phase project, and measured the work intensity associated with actual patient care of 108 neurologists, family physicians, general internists and surgeons in the southeast United States.

Medicine

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Children's Health, Pediatrics, Anesthesia, Brain Development, Surgery, Sedatives, Drugs, Pharmacology, Neurotoxicity, SmartTots

Safety of Commonly Used Anesthetics Strongly Age Dependent

Animal studies indicate commonly used general anesthetics administered during critical stages of brain development can cause detrimental impairments in synapse formation and cognitive function. Insufficient evidence currently exists to support or refute whether similar effects could occur in young children. SmartTots is centralizing research efforts to determine and ensure the safe use of anesthetics and sedatives in children.

Science

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Titin, Prosthetics, transhumanism, ballistic prey catching, Neuroscience

Researcher Sees Spring-Like Protein as Key to Muscle Behavior

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An idea with its origins in ballistic prey catching—the way toads and chameleons snatch food with their tongues—may change fundamental views of muscle movement while powering a new approach to prosthetics. After a decade of work, lead author Kiisa Nishikawa, Regents’ professor of biology at Northern Arizona University, and an international team of collaborators have published their hypothesis about spring-loaded muscles.

Medicine

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Stroke Prevention Trial Reveals High-Risk Patients Without Stents Implanted Had Fewer Second Strokes

Specialists in Stony Brook University School of Medicine took part in a NIH-sponsored clinical trial that reveals high-risk patients without stents implanted had fewer second strokes.

Medicine

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Mayo Clinic

Scientists Discover Genetic Mutation that Causes Parkinson’s Disease

A large team of international researchers have identified a new genetic cause of inherited Parkinson’s disease that they say may be related to the inability of brain cells to handle biological stress.

Medicine

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Brain, Ultrasound, Epilelpsy, Parkinson Disease Treatment, depression treatment, Neuromodulation

Guide Describes Ultrasound Use in Emergencies for Brain Disorders

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The discovery that low-intensity, pulsed ultrasound can be used to noninvasively stimulate intact brain circuits holds promise for engineering rapid-response medical devices.

Medicine

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Stroke, Stenosis, Neurology, Brain, Blocked Blood Vessels, Plaque, Stent, Stenting, medical management, Drug Therapy, Arteries, Stroke Prevention, narrowed brain arteries, Narrowed Arteries

Medical Management Alone May Be Best Treatment Course for Stroke Prevention

Patients with narrowed arteries in the brain who received intensive medical treatment had fewer strokes and deaths than patients who received a brain stent in addition to medical treatment, according to the initial results from the first, nationwide stroke prevention trial to compare the two treatment options. The results of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) study called Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) are published in the online first edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Medicine

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Stroke, SAMMPRIS, Stenting vs. Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis, Intracranial Stents, Intracranial angioplasty , Brain Stent

Sorting Out Major Brain Stent Study: Cedars-Sinai Experts Say Procedure Effective for Some Patients

An article appearing in the Sept. 7 New England Journal of Medicine, reporting on NIH research on brain stents, says aggressive medical treatment without stenting is better for high-risk stroke patients. But experts at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center who were involved in the study believe this procedure is appropriate for some patients. They say this study is a helpful start but not likely to be the final word on understanding when stenting may be appropriate, and raise concerns about several study limitations and exclusions.

Medicine

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Stroke, Recurrent Stroke, Brain Stent, brain blockage, wingspan stent, Intracranial Stents, intracranial atherosclerosis

Stroke Prevention Trial Has Immediate Implications for Treating Patients

People who received intensive medical treatment following a first stroke had fewer second episodes and were less likely to die than people who received brain stents in addition to medical treatment, according to a new report in the New England Journal of Medicine, to be published online Sept. 7. All patients in the study had experienced one stroke and were considered at high risk for a second one.

Medicine

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Neurology, Stroke, clinical trial, intracranial arterial blockage, medical therapy, moderate cerebral arterial blockage, Stenosis, Dr. Mitchell Elkind, Dr. Philip Meyers, Dr. Y. Pierre Gobin, Dr. Dana Leifer

Intensive Medical Therapy More Effective Than Stenting for Preventing a Second Stroke

Patients at a high risk for a second stroke who received intensive medical treatment had fewer strokes and deaths than patients who received a brain stent in addition to the medical treatment, a large nationwide clinical trial has shown. The investigators published the results in today's online first edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, funded the trial.







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