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  • Embargo expired:
    6-May-2012 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 588960

Multiple Thought Channels May Help Brain Avoid Traffic Jams​

Washington University in St. Louis

Brain networks may avoid traffic jams at their busiest intersections by communicating on different frequencies, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University Medical Center at Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University of Tübingen have learned.

Released:
4-May-2012 2:45 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-May-2012 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 588887

Rats Recall Past to Make Daily Decisions

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

UCSF scientists have identified patterns of brain activity in the rat brain that play a role in the formation and recall of memories and decision-making. The discovery, which builds on the team’s previous findings, offers a path for studying learning, decision-making and post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Released:
3-May-2012 11:55 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-May-2012 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 588754

Pleasure Eating Triggers Body’s Reward System and May Stimulate Overeating

Endocrine Society

When eating is motivated by pleasure, rather than hunger, endogenous rewarding chemical signals are activated which can lead to overeating, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). The phenomenon ultimately affects body mass and may be a factor in the continuing rise of obesity.

Released:
1-May-2012 7:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 588858

Junior Seau’s Death Keeps Spotlight on Concussion Issues in Sports

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Junior Seau’s apparent suicide might shock the sports world, but not concussion specialists. NFL players have a higher rate of depression, substance abuse, and dementia. This is thought to be connected to head impactssays UAB's James Johnston Jr., M.D.

Released:
2-May-2012 4:30 PM EDT
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Neuro, Sports Medicine

  • Embargo expired:
    2-May-2012 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 588547

Eating Fish, Chicken, Nuts May Lower Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study suggests that eating foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, such as fish, chicken, salad dressing and nuts, may be associated with lower blood levels of a protein related to Alzheimer’s disease and memory problems. The research is published in the May 2, 2012, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
25-Apr-2012 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 588844

Why Underweight Babies Become Obese: Study Says Disrupted Hypothalamus Is to Blame

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new animal model study at UCLA has found that in low–birth-weight babies whose growth was restricted in the womb, the level of appetite-producing neuropeptides in the brain's hypothalamus — the central control of the appetite — is higher, resulting in a natural tendency among these children to consume more calories.

Released:
2-May-2012 2:25 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 588616

Neuro Researchers Sharpen Our Understanding of Memories

Universite de Montreal

Scientists now have a better understanding of how precise memories are formed thanks to research led by Prof. Jean-Claude Lacaille of the University of Montreal’s Department of Physiology. “In terms of human applications, these findings could help us to better understand memory impairments in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease,” Lacaille said. The study looks at the cells in our brains, or neurons, and how they work together as a group to form memories.

Released:
26-Apr-2012 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 588685

Dopamine Impacts Your Willingness to Work

Vanderbilt University

A new brain imaging study that has found an individual’s willingness to work hard to earn money is strongly influenced by the activity of dopamine in three specific areas of the brain.

Released:
30-Apr-2012 8:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 588800

Biosynthetic Grape-Derived Compound Prevents Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease in Animal Model

Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers have succeeded in developing a biosynthetic polyphenol that improves cognitive function in mice with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The findings, published in a recent issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, provide insight in determining the feasibility of biosynthetic polyphenols as a possible therapy for AD in humans, a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which there is currently no cure.

Released:
1-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 588801

Researchers Gain Better Understanding of the Mechanism Behind Tau Spreading in the Brain and the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have gained insight into the mechanism by which a pathological brain protein called tau contributes to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. This finding, published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, may provide the basis for future investigations on how to prevent tau from damaging brain circuits involved in cognitive function.

Released:
1-May-2012 5:00 PM EDT
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