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T-ALL, T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, TAL1 protein

NUS Researchers Make Inroads Into Finding Out How T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Develops

A research team from the National University of Singapore led by Assistant Professor Takaomi Sanda, Principal Investigator from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and Department of Medicine at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, has provided new insights into the molecular mechanism affecting how genes are produced during normal T-cell development, and contributing to leukaemia formation.

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Hematology, Blood Clot, Thrombosis, Blood Thinner, Platelets

Jefferson Researcher Identifies Targets for Better Anti-Thrombotic Medicine

Blood thinners, such as aspirin, reduce the risk of thrombus formation but also interfere with the initial clot formation that is essential for preventing blood loss from the wounds. Now researchers have discovered that a molecule plays a role in thrombus development, but not the initial clot formation, suggesting a new avenue for developing more specific and protective blood thinners.

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Clinical Trials

University of Kansas Cancer Center Partners with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to Offer Innovative Blood Cancer Clinical Trials

The University of Kansas Cancer Center joins Blood Cancer Research Partnership

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Penn’s Garret FitzGerald Receives American Heart Association Merit Award to Enhance Blood Pressure Control

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Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1 million Merit Award from the American Heart Association (AHA) to help the millions of patients with high blood pressure improve their condition.

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New Heart Disease Risk Genes Point to Flaws in Blood Vessel Walls

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite dozens of regions in the genome associated with CAD, most of the genetic components of heart diseases are not fully understood, suggesting that more genes are out there to be found. A team found 15 new risk genes for coronary artery disease.

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circadian blood pressure variation, Circadian Rhythms, circadian fluctuations, Glaucoma, glaucoma awareness, ophthalmolgy, Eye Care

Circadian Fluctuations in Glaucoma

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Brian Samuels, M.D., says there is an increase of eye pressure throughout the morning, and that pressure comes and goes throughout the day. This fluctuation is a known risk factor for the progression of glaucoma.

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Platelets, Blood, megakaryocytes, Pediatrics, NICU, Premature Babies, Premature Infants, Infants, Bone Marrow, Infantile, Adult, Adam Goldfarb, Kamal Elagib, Pathology, University Of Virginia, University of Viginia School of Medicine, Medical Research, Research, medical discovery, Discovery, platelet formation, ex vivo, producing platelets, neonatal thrombocytop

Blood Discovery Could Benefit Preemies, Help End Platelet Shortages

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A new discovery may be the key to stopping shortages of vital blood-clotting cells that can represent the difference between life and death. The finding also could offer big benefits for premature babies.

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Anemia, Research, Health System, Ut Southwestern

Hospital-Acquired Anemia More Common, Increases Risks

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One in three patients hospitalized for medical problems experienced a drop in their red blood cell count due to the hospitalization – a concept called hospital-acquired anemia, new research showed.

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Blood Test, Healthcare, Infectious Disease, Healthcare Costs, drug-resistant infections, Public Health

New Blood Test Technology Reduces False Readings, Saves Costs, and Improves Care - Live Virtual Press Briefing with Researcher May 16

Research findings to be published about new blood test technology that will greatly reduce errors in labwork and improve care in public health and infectious disease. Press briefing scheduled for May 16, reserve press access to live virtual event now.

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Study Shows Novel Device Significantly Reduces Blood Draw Contamination, Reduces Risks to Patients

A study at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) found that a novel device can significantly reduce contamination of blood cultures, potentially reducing risky overtreatment and unnecessary use of antibiotics for many patients. This approach could also substantially reduce healthcare costs, according to the study. Thousands of U.S. patients get their blood drawn every day for blood cultures in order to diagnose serious infections such as sepsis, which can be a deadly condition. A small but significant percentage of the blood cultures are contaminated, due in part to skin fragments containing bacteria that are dislodged during a blood draw. This leads to false results that can mislead clinicians into thinking a patient has a potentially serious bloodstream infection. The consequences are costly and put patients at risk.







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