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Medicine

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Biology, DNA, genes, Neuromuscular, neurodegernative, Huntington's Disease, Genetics

Runaway DNA Repair Process May Cause Dozen Debilitating Diseases

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Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for a genetic error that causes over a dozen neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders.

Medicine

Science

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Toxicology, Awards, Awards and Honors, Neurodegenerative Disease, Pesticides, Allergen, Risk Assessment, alternatives to animal testing

Researchers Studying Neurodegenerative Diseases, Painkillers, Animal Testing Alternatives, and More Recognized with 2017 SOT Awards

The 2017 SOT Awards recipients have studied the role of pesticide exposure on neurodegenerative diseases, connections between chemicals and the susceptibility to allergies and asthma, risk assessment, alternative test methods and strategies, and more, in their efforts to improve public, animal and environmental health.

Medicine

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Mental Health, Counseling

Virginia Tech Expert: 21st Century Cures Act Puts Mental Health Treatment Shortcomings in the Spotlight

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Science

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Brain, brain-computer interface

University of Minnesota Research Shows That People Can Control a Robotic Arm with Only Their Minds

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Researchers at the University of Minnesota have made a major breakthrough that allows people to control a robotic arm using only their minds. The research has the potential to help millions of people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases.

Medicine

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Down's Syndrome, Alzheimer's Disease, Hydrocephalus, Notch Signaling, Gamma-secretase

Research Identifies a Molecular Basis for Common Congenital Brain Defect

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Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have discovered a molecular cause of hydrocephalus, a common, potentially life-threatening birth defect in which the head is enlarged due to excess fluid surrounding the brain. Because the same molecule is also implicated in Down’s syndrome, the finding, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience, may explain the ten-fold increased risk of hydrocephalus in infants born with Down’s.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Brain, Cranial, Electromagnetic, Transcranial, Magnetic, Stimulation

Weston Brain Institute Funds Clinical Trials of New Alzheimer’s Treatment

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Electrocranial stimulation offers hope for Alzheimer's patients

Medicine

Life

Education

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disability resources, special needs college student, Head Injury, tubing accident, Empathy, perseverence

Iowa State Senior Rebounds From Head Injury to Graduate

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On her way to becoming a teacher, Amanda Rohlf hit a brick wall. Actually it was a lake. But the way her head struck the water, it might as well have been a wall. With extraordinary inner strength and TLC from her university, Rohlf bulldozed through those bricks to graduate magna cum laude from Iowa State.

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Brain Structure Best Explains Our Dwindling Tolerance of Risk

Our brain’s changing structure, not simply getting older and wiser, most affects our attitudes to risk, according to new research.

Medicine

Science

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Parkinson Disease, Cataracts, Degenerative Disease, Genomics, Neurodegeneration, Research, National Insitutes of Health

Study First to Demonstrate Role of Parkin Gene in Eye Lens Free Radical Formation and Cell Survival

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A new study is the first to show that the Parkin gene is turned on when cells are exposed to environmental insults that cause free radical formation and cataract formation. Researchers have discovered that through the removal of mitochondria that are damaged by these environmental insults, Parkin prevents free radical formation in lens cells and increases the ability of the cells to survive exposure to conditions that are associated with aging and the development of many degenerative diseases.

Medicine

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Austism spectrum disorder, genes

Mutations in Life’s “Essential Genes” Tied to Autism

Genes known to be essential to life—the ones humans need to survive and thrive in the womb—also play a critical role in the development of autism spectrum disorder, suggests a new study

Medicine

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Alzheimer's prevention, Diabetes Prevention Program, effective peer and community edu

Diabetes Prevention IS Alzheimer's Prevention

Commenting on a Financial Times feature on drug trials of the "plaque" theory of Alzheimer's---all of which have failed so far---Chris Norwood, in a lead letter, underscores that targeted diabetes prevention is really the major documented path to Alzheimer's prevention

Medicine

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Fragile X, Fragile X Syndrome, Neurology, Pediatric

Rush University Medical Center Awarded $11.5 Million for Fragile X Research

Rush University Medical Center was awarded an $11.5 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a Phase II national clinical trial for children with fragile X syndrome.

Medicine

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University Of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Carilion Clinic, Neuroscience, Rett Syndrome, multiple sclerosis, microscephaly, Seizures

UVA, Virginia Tech Carilion Partner to Fund Cross-University Neuroscience Research

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The University of Virginia-Virginia Tech Carilion Neuroscience Research Collaboration capitalized on the talent in brain research in the Commonwealth of Virginia by encouraging cross-institutional research projects.

Medicine

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Brain Injury, concussion awarenes, CDC, concussions youth sports, Concussions, Ut Southwestern

Nation’s Largest State Effort to Track Concussions in Youth Athletes Under Way in Texas

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The nation’s largest statewide effort to track concussions among youth athletes is under way in Texas with the launch of a registry designed to assess the prevalence of brain injuries in high school sports.

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Penn Medicine Neuroscientist Among First to Receive NIH Funding Under Novel, Multi-Year Pilot Program

Greg J. Bashaw, PhD, a professor of Neuroscience at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been awarded research funding under a novel, multi-year pilot program from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Medicine

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faculty appointment, New Hire

Renowned Neuroscientist Jerold Chun Joins Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Jerold Chun, M.D., Ph.D., a trailblazer in research on the development and diseases of the brain, is joining the faculty of Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) as professor and senior vice president of Neuroscience Drug Discovery. Chun comes to SBP from The Scripps Research Institute.

Medicine

Science

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Hearing, Cell Biology, Nervous System, Nerve Cells, Brain, ear, auditory nerve, Auditory System, Neurotransmitter

How Hearing Loss Can Change the Way Nerve Cells Are Wired

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Even short-term blockages in hearing can lead to remarkable changes in the auditory system, altering the behavior and structure of nerve cells that relay information from the ear to the brain, according to a new University at Buffalo study.

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Researchers’ Discovery of New Verbal Working Memory Architecture Has Implications for Artificial Intelligence

The neural structure we use to store and process information in verbal working memory is more complex than previously understood--a discovery that has implications for the creation of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, such as speech translation tools.

Medicine

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Tania Caballero, Sarah Polk, Mental Health, Screening, Latino, Latina, Spanish, immigrant

Researchers Identify Mental Health Screening Tools, Barriers for Latino Children

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In a bid to improve mental health screening of Latino children from immigrant families, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified a culturally sensitive set of tools that are freely available to pediatricians, take less than 10 minutes to use, are in easy-to-read Spanish, and assess a wide range of emotional and behavioral problems.

Medicine

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Concussion, CTE, Football, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Epidemiology Project

High School Football Players, 1956-1970, Did Not Have Increase of Neurodegenerative Diseases

ROCHESTER, Minn. – A Mayo Clinic study published online today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports.







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