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Article ID: 649790

Cell Phone Radiation and Tumors, World Cancer Day 2018, Gut Bacteria and Colon Cancer, and More in the Cancer News Source

Newswise

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Released:
6-Feb-2018 3:45 PM EST
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Biotech, Blood Disorders, Bone Health, Cancer, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Children's Health, Complementary Medicine, Dermatology, Genetics, Healthcare, Immunology, Drug Resistance, Infectious Diseases, Kidney Disease, Men's Health, Mental Health, Military Health, Mindfulness, Neuro, Nursing, Nutrition, OBGYN, Oral Health, Pain, Personalized Medicine, Pharmaceuticals

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Article ID: 689090

New Algorithm Decodes Spine Oncology Treatment

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Every kind of cancer can spread to the spine, yet two physician-scientists who treat these patients describe a paucity of guidance for effectively providing care and minimizing pain. To resolve the confusion and address the continually changing landscape of spine oncology, a recent Michigan Medicine-led publication details a guide to explain the management of spinal metastases.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 3:30 PM EST
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Neuro, Surgery, Cancer, All Journal News

Article ID: 689063

The Mind of a Medalist:

Johns Hopkins University

Athletes who make it to the Olympics have the speed or strength or whatever physical skills it takes to lead the world in their sport. But Johns Hopkins University scientists say (in three videos) that those who ultimately bring home gold have also honed the mind of a medalist.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 689056

TSRI Receives $10 Million Grant to Study Effects of Alcohol on the Brain

Scripps Research Institute

The five-year grant will support five individual research projects and three core resources at the TSRI Alcohol Research Center.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Neuro, Local - California, Grant Funded News

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Article ID: 689038

Sleepless in Latin America: Blind Cavefish, Extreme Environments and Insomnia

Florida Atlantic University

Researchers have found that differences in the production of the neuropeptide Hypocretin, previously implicated in human narcolepsy, may explain variation in sleep between animal species, or even between individual people. It may also provide important insight into how we might build a brain that does not need to sleep.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 9:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 689019

Reversing Blood Flow Reduces Stroke Risk During Carotid Artery Procedure

Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine is the first academic medical center in Illinois to use the TCAR system, which reduces stroke risk during carotid artery procedures by temporarily reversing blood flow.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
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Cardiovascular Health, Neuro, Local - Illinois, Local - Chicago Metro

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Article ID: 688977

Altering Huntington’s Disease Patients’ Skin Cells Into Brain Cells Sheds Light on Disorder

Washington University in St. Louis

Pictured are reprogrammed cells from a 71-year-old patient with Huntington's disease. Originally skin cells, these have been converted into medium spiny neurons, the cell type affected in Huntington's disease. Sampling skin cells from patients and converting them directly into neurons affected by the disorder is a new tool to help understand why nerve cells die in this fatal condition.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Nature (journal)

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Article ID: 688963

Dim Light May Make US Dumber

Michigan State University

Spending too much time in dimly lit rooms and offices may actually change the brain's structure and hurt one's ability to remember and learn, indicates groundbreaking research by Michigan State University neuroscientists.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Cognition and Learning, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry

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Article ID: 688871

Landmark Firefighter Health Study Leads to Improved Support

University of Adelaide

The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS), in conjunction with the University of Adelaide, has conducted a landmark study into the mental and physical health of its firefighters.

Released:
5-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Mental Health, Neuro

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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688831

Hatchet Enzyme, Enabler of Sickness and of Health, Exposed by Neutron Beams

Georgia Institute of Technology

A pioneering glimpse at an enzyme inside elusive cell membranes elucidates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With neutron beams, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 3:35 PM EST
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All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cell Biology, Neuro, Chemistry, Local - Atlanta Metro


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