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Article ID: 688800

Study Reveals How the Most Common DNA Mutation Happens

Ohio State University

Shape-shifters aren’t just the stuff of fiction, they’re real—and they’re inside our DNA. In the Feb. 1 issue of the journal Nature, researchers describe how two mismatched bases in human DNA change shape in order to avoid the body’s natural defenses against genetic mutations.

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1-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cell Biology, Genetics, Aging, Cancer, Nature (journal), Local - Ohio

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Article ID: 688868

Research Uncovers Gene Network That Regulates Motor Neuron Formation During Embryonic Development

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have discovered the inner workings of a gene network that regulates the development of spinal motor neurons in the growing chicken and mouse embryo. The research also answers a long-standing question about why motor neurons, the nerve cells of the spinal cord that control muscle movement, form much faster than other types of neurons.

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1-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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    31-Jan-2018 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688711

Landmark International Study: CAR T-Cell Therapy Safe and Effective in Children and Young Adults with Leukemia

Childrens Hospital Los Angeles

Results of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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30-Jan-2018 8:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688744

Mariana Wolfner Recognized with 2018 Genetics Society of America Medal

Genetics Society of America

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is pleased to announce that Professor Mariana Wolfner of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Cornell University is the recipient of the 2018 Genetics Society of America Medal for her work on reproduction. Wolfner and her colleagues have identified proteins in the seminal fluid of fruit flies that are transmitted to female flies during mating, manipulating the females’ physiology and behavior.

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31-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 688743

Steven R. Brant Sheds Light on the Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Rutgers University

Brant’s hire establishes Rutgers as one of the six IBD Genetics Consortium centers.

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31-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688745

ID’ing Features of Flu Virus Genome May Help Target Surveillance for Pandemic Flu

Washington University in St. Louis

A pandemic flu outbreak could kill millions. Now, researchers have found features of the virus's genome that influence how well it multiplies. The findings could help target pandemic flu surveillance efforts to make it easier to find the next outbreak before it spreads widely.

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31-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688728

Researchers Identify Novel Drivers of Cancer Stem Cells That Lead to Colon Cancer Development and Growth

Christiana Care Health System

In breakthrough colon cancer research, scientists at Christiana Care Health System’s Center for Translational Cancer Research (CTCR) of the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute have discovered that over-expression of HOXA4 and HOXA9 genes in colon cancer stem cells promotes cell replication and contributes to the overpopulation of stem cells that drives colon cancer development. The findings suggest treatment with vitamin A derivatives, called retinoid drugs, could provide a therapeutic strategy for decreasing the expression of these HOX genes and for targeting highly resistant cancer stem cells.

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31-Jan-2018 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 688732

Novel Computational Biology Model Accurately Describes Dynamics of Gene Expression

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Using a simple analytical framework for random events within a predictable system, computational biologists have found a new way to accurately model certain forms of gene expression, including the body's 24-hour internal clock. This new approach of applying a piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP) to gene expression could inform possible design principles for synthetic biologists

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31-Jan-2018 11:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-Jan-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688582

Scientists Discover How Gene Mutation Triggers Immune Disease

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists discovered how a gene mutation affects T cell function to promote immune disorders and then tested a treatment based on the discovery—successfully fixing donated immune cells from a 16-year-old boy with an abnormally low level of white blood cells called lymphopenia. Researchers report their findings Jan. 30 in Nature Communications

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29-Jan-2018 8:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 688599

Researchers Reverse Symptoms in Neurologic Disease Model

Case Western Reserve University

It is a parent’s nightmare: a child is born apparently healthy, then stops meeting developmental milestones at one year old. Her verbal and motor skills vanish, and irregular breathing, seizures, and a host of other problems appear. The cause is Rett syndrome—a devastating genetic, neurologic disorder that typically affects girls, resulting in severe disability and often accompanied by autistic behavior. Most Rett patients will live into middle age and require specialized full-time care. There is no cure, but researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have been working to find ways to restore brain function and reverse disabilities associated with Rett syndrome.

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29-Jan-2018 11:05 AM EST
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