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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692058

Early Stimulation Improves Performance of Bioengineered Human Heart Cells

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Researchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage.

Released:
2-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692232

Freedom and Flexibility: Thinking Outside the Cell for Functional Genomics

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

JGI has developed capabilities to move beyond generating a DNA sequence to understanding gene functions. Through the JGI’s Emerging Technologies Opportunity Program, researchers aim to develop an optimized cell-free platform to help speed up the design-build-test-analyze cycle in synthetic biology.

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4-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692132

Mutation of Worm Gene, Swip-10, Triggers Age-Dependent Death of Dopamine Neurons, Key Feature of Parkinson’s Disease

Florida Atlantic University

By visualizing dopamine neurons in a tiny worm's brain, scientists have identified a novel pathway that sustains the health of these cells. The study shows that the normal actions of swip-10 to protect dopamine neurons are indirect, derived from the gene’s action in support cells called glia that lie adjacent to the dopamine neurons. Glial cells are recognized to play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and function, however, this research offers a clear demonstration that they also keep dopamine cells alive.

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4-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692133

UTSW Researcher Recognized with Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences

UT Southwestern Medical Center

T Southwestern Medical Center Professor Dr. Zhijian “James” Chen today became the recipient of the 2018 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences for his discovery of the cGAS enzyme, a sensor of innate immunity. The enzyme patrols the cell’s interior and sounds the alarm to trigger the immune system in response to DNA.

Released:
3-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 691950

Genetic Material Once Considered Junk Actually Could Hold Key to Cancer Drug Response, Mount Sinai Researchers Find

Mount Sinai Health System

Material left out of common processes for sequencing genetic material in cancer tumors may actually carry important information about why only some people respond to immunotherapy, possibly offering better insight than the type of material that is being sequenced, according to a study by Mount Sinai researchers published on April 3 in Cell Reports.

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29-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692129

Election 2018: More Women Than Ever Are Running for Office

California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Political science faculty across the CSU say it's an exciting time for women in politics, but there's still plenty to do to achieve gender balance in federal, state, and local government.

Released:
3-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 692074

Could a Cup of Joe a Day Keep the Doctor and Death Away?

Florida Atlantic University

So what is it about the link between drinking coffee and living longer? Could it be the 200 plus organic compounds in the coffee bean itself and its proven benefits of reducing inflammation and regulating glucose levels? Or could it be something else?

Released:
3-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692103

Fred Hutch Tip Sheet - 04/03/18

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

The Fred Hutch Tip Sheet includes story ideas about: New paths to malaria prevention; proteins involved in muscular dystrophy; pathogen-associated cancers; lung cancer in women who never smoked; financial impact of cancer care; more

Released:
2-Apr-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692093

Genome Time Machine

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A group of Penn researchers hopes to improve the understanding of these present-day ailments by looking at the very engine of evolution: natural selection in humans.

Released:
2-Apr-2018 4:35 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692064

Even DNA that Doesn’t Encode Genes Can Drive Cancer

University of California San Diego Health

The vast majority of genetic mutations associated with cancer occur in non-coding regions of the genome, yet it’s unclear how they may influence tumor development or growth. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center identified nearly 200 mutations in non-coding DNA that play a role in cancer. Each mutation could represent a new cancer drug target.

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2-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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