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Article ID: 695665

The Psychosocial Toll of Our Increasingly Online Lives

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Technology carries the promise to make our lives easier, but at what price? UNLV sociologist Simon Gottschalk explains his research in a new book.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695620

Throw like a girl? No, he or she just hasn't been taught

University of Michigan

"You throw like a girl" is a sexist taunt that can instantly sour a kid on athletics and other healthy activities. But many children—mainly girls—simply aren't taught or don't learn the basic motor skills like throwing, running, jumping or dribbling, say University of Michigan researchers.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695608

​Coffee helps teams work together, study suggests

Ohio State University

Good teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group’s performance on a task – and their own contribution – if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695525

An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrow

Michigan State University

When bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs though, and can lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research from Michigan State University took prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocused the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own abusive behavior.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695528

Does stabilizing female hormones help lower suicide risk?

University of Illinois at Chicago

A three-year, $750,000 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health will help researchers determine whether the stabilization of ovarian hormones estradiol and progesterone can help lower symptoms associated with suicidality among females at risk for suicide.While estradiol and progesterone rise and fall over the course of the menstrual cycle, the hormones plummet to their lowest levels just before and during menses.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695474

Leading Neuroscientist Responds to Common Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease

Florida Atlantic University

Approximately 47 million people worldwide are living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other dementias. One of the most prominent neuroscientists in the country has developed eight myths and truths about AD to shed light on this form of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695355

Simple Touching Fosters Wellness and Relieves Stress for Couples

Family Institute at Northwestern University

Partners were found to have lower levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, on days when they enjoyed higher levels of physical touch like hand holding or hugging.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695470

Act Fast to Pay Attention

Washington University in St. Louis

Want to improve your attention? Washington University in St. Louis brain sciences researcher Richard Abrams finds that our attention may be guided by the most recent interactions with our environment.

Released:
3-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695443

Fortune — and Nature — Favors the Bold

Washington University in St. Louis

Some people argue that animals have personalities: shy, bold, aggressive.It’s more than just cocktail party conversation for anole lizards, whose risk-taking behavior can mean the difference between life and death.For anoles in the Caribbean islands, natural selection predictably favors exploratory behavior in the absence of predators, and ground avoidance when predators are around, according to a new experimental field study in the June 1 issue of Science.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695351

Research Finds Link Between Reduction in Firearm Suicides and “Red Flag” Gun Laws

Academy Communications

With more than 20 “red flag” gun bills pending in state legislatures, risk-based gun seizure laws have emerged as a prominent policy option for reducing gun violence. A new study by Aaron Kivisto of the University of Indianapolis--appearing in the June edition of the journal Psychiatric Services--provides evidence that risk-based gun seizure laws do work and are saving lives.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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