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Article ID: 692054

Mount Sinai of New York and Els for Autism Foundation Join Forces to Establish Research Institute at The Els Center of Excellence in Jupiter, Florida

Mount Sinai Health System

The newly created Seaver Els Institute will bring together personalized education, clinical research and scientific investigation for individuals and families who are affected by autism spectrum disorder

Released:
2-Apr-2018 11:50 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691687

Monkeys' Brains Synchronize As They Collaborate To Perform A Motor Task

Duke Health

Scientists have previously shown that when one animal watches another performing a motor task, such as reaching for food, mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the observer's brain start firing as though the observer were also reaching for food. New Duke research appearing March 29 in the journal Scientific Reports suggests mirroring in monkeys is also influenced by social factors, such as proximity to other animals, social hierarchy and competition for food.

Released:
26-Mar-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Mar-2018 6:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691448

The Brain Learns Completely Differently Than We've Assumed Since the 20th Century

Bar-Ilan University

Based on experimental evidence physicists publish revolutionary new theory on brain learning that contradicts the most common assumption in neuroscience, will transform our understanding of brain function, and open new horizons for advanced deep learning algorithms.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 690793

Using Simplicity for Complexity—New Research Sheds Light on the Perception of Motion

New York University

A team of biologists has deciphered how neurons used in the perception of motion form in the brain of a fly —a finding that illustrates how complex neuronal circuits are constructed from simple developmental rules.

Released:
15-Mar-2018 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691524

Early Life Adversity for Parents Linked to Delayed Development of Their Children

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s report in the journal Pediatrics a link between parents impacted by adverse childhood experiences and increased risk for delayed development of their children at age two.

Released:
21-Mar-2018 12:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691413

Amygdala Neurons Increase as Children Become Adults – Except in Autism

UC Davis MIND Institute

In a striking new finding, researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute found that typically-developing children gain more neurons in a region of the brain that governs social and emotional behavior, the amygdala, as they become adults. This phenomenon does not happen in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Instead, children with ASD have too many neurons early on and then appear to lose those neurons as they become adults. The findings were published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Released:
20-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691333

New Research Into Letter-Spacing Could Help Improve Children’s Reading

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Increased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

Released:
19-Mar-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    17-Mar-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691087

Exposure to Low Levels of BPA During Pregnancy Can Lead to Altered Brain Development

Endocrine Society

New research in mice provides an explanation for how exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated “safe” human exposure level, can lead to altered brain development and behavior later in life. The research will be presented Monday, March 19 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.

Released:
14-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Mar-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 690939

Altering Songbird Brain Provides Insight Into Human Behavior

UT Southwestern Medical Center

A study from UT Southwestern's Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute demonstrates that a bird's song can be altered -- to the syllable -- by activating and deactivating a neuronal pathway responsible for helping the brain determine whether a vocalization is performed correctly.

Released:
12-Mar-2018 12:20 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 690957

Two Behaviors Linked to High School Dropout Rates

University of Georgia

The factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study from the University of Georgia sheds light on how two behaviors-aggression and weak study skills-contribute to the problem.

Released:
12-Mar-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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