Feature Channels:

Chemistry

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Still Laboratory Seeks ‘Novel Lead Compound’ to Help Treat Cancer

JSF_7082_1500.jpg

Still uses the NMR spectrometer to conduct his research on plant extracts he procured from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Active Repository Program.

Medicine

Channels:

face transplant, Face Transplantation, Biomaterials, Cleveland Clinic, Afirm, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, Rutgers University, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Joachim Kohn, Rutgers-Cleveland Clinic Consortium, RCCC, Battlefield Injuries, regenerative madicine, Immunosuppresion

Rutgers University Leadership Paves Way for Breakthrough Medical Research Including Cleveland Clinic’s First Total Face Transplant

Dr.JoachimKohn.jpg

Under the leadership of Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientist Dr. Joachim Kohn, a civilian research program established by the U.S. Department of Defense to focus on regenerative medicine for the treatment of battlefield injuries has made great strides that culminated in a total face transplant performed at the Cleveland Clinic in May.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Biochemistry, RNA, Fluoride, NMR

The Science of Fluoride Flipping

rna.jpg

A new imaging technique helps UNC researchers study tiny, time-sensitive biological processes – the crucial underpinnings of human health and disease.

Science

Channels:

New Computational Model of Chemical Building Blocks May Help Explain the Origins of Life

DillKen1.jpg

A research team from Stony Brook University and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a computational model explaining how certain molecules fold and bind together to grow and evolve from chemistry to biology.

Science

Channels:

Chemists Get Step Closer to Replicating Nature with Assembly of New 3D Structures

A team of chemists has created a series of three-dimensional structures that take a step closer to resembling those found in nature. The work offers insights into how enzymes are properly assembled, or folded, which could enhance our understanding of a range of diseases that result from these misfolded proteins.

Science

Channels:

Press Conference Schedule: 254th American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition, Aug. 20-24, 2017

Press Conference Schedule

Medicine

Channels:

Ulcerative Colitis, Colitis, Blood Test, infrared spectroscopy, Colonoscopy, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Didier Merlin, A. G. Unil Perera

Blood Test for Colitis Screening Using Infrared Technology Could Reduce Dependence on Colonoscopy, Study Finds

unilperera_240x240.jpg

A fast, simple blood test for ulcerative colitis using infrared spectroscopy could provide a cheaper, less invasive alternative for screening compared to colonoscopy, which is now the predominant test, according to a study between the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

Medicine

Channels:

Microbiome, Citizen Science, Crowdsourcing, Immunology, World Community Grid, IBM

Help UC San Diego Scientists Study Link Between Body Bacteria and Autoimmune Diseases

The public's help is being enlisted in the Microbiome Immunity Project, what's thought to be the biggest study to date of the human microbiome — the communities of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on the human body, where they influence our health.

Science

Channels:

Carbon Fiber, Plants

Spinning Plant Waste Into Carbon Fiber for Cars, Planes

Using plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin, a component of plant cell walls. That leftover lignin isn’t good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts.

Medicine

Channels:

Mosquitoes Fatally Attracted to Deadly, Sweet-Smelling Potion

Mosquitoes aren’t just blood thirsty. They also have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to get the sugar they need to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method. The new, inexpensive technique tricks these annoying pests into gorging themselves on insecticides laced with a concoction that mimics the sweet-smelling scents and aromas that they find irresistible. It could bolster efforts to suppress malaria, Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases worldwide.







Chat now!