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Article ID: 689914

Imaging Individual Flexible DNA ‘Building Blocks’ in 3-D

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and Ohio State University have generated 3-D images from 129 individual molecules of flexible DNA origami particles. Their work provides the first experimental verification of the theoretical model of DNA origami. https://newscenter.lbl.gov/2018/02/22/imaging-individual-flexible-dna-building-blocks-3-d

Released:
22-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 689969

Using Light and Gold for Targeted, Non-Invasive Drug Delivery

American Technion Society

Researchers have developed a highly-targeted and non-invasive drug-release method that combines a nanoscale gold particle-containing polymer coating and near-infrared light. The technology could also be used for other applications, including the sealing of internal and external injuries, and as biodegradable scaffolds for growing transplant organs.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689880

Remembering Really Fast

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Colossal magnetoresistance at terahertz frequencies in thin composites boosts novel memory devices operated at extremely high speed.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 7:55 AM EST
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Article ID: 689878

Tuning Quantum Light Sources

Department of Energy, Office of Science

First known material capable of emitting single photons at room temperature and telecom wavelengths.

Released:
21-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 689875

A Nanowire Array to Screen Drugs for Neurodegenerative Diseases

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Engineers develop wires that penetrate neurons and measure their activity

Released:
21-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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BES-2018-02-d-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 689709

Squeezing Into the Best Shape

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Gel uses nanoparticles for on-demand control of droplet shapes, of interest for energy storage and catalysis.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 3:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 689849

MEMS Chips Get Metalenses

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Lens technologies have advanced across all scales, from digital cameras and high bandwidth in fiber optics to the LIGO lab instruments. Now, a new lens technology that could be produced using standard computer-chip technology is emerging and could replace the bulky layers and complex geometries of traditional curved lenses. Researchers at Harvard and Argonne National Laboratory have developed a device that integrates mid-infrared spectrum metalenses onto MEMS. They report their work in this week’s APL Photonics.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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BES-2018-02-h-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 689848

Single Atoms in Nano-Cages

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Tiny cages can trap and release inert argon gas atoms, allowing their further study and providing a new way to capture rare gases.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 689820

Researchers Invent Tiny, Light-Powered Wires to Modulate Brain's Electrical Signals

University of Chicago

A new University of Chicago study shows how tiny, light-powered wires could be fashioned out of silicon to manipulate electrical signaling between neurons. Published Feb. 19 in Nature Nanotechnology, the study offers a new avenue to shed light on—and perhaps someday treat—brain disorders.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689728

Supercomputers Aid Discovery of New, Inexpensive Material to Make LEDs with Excellent Color Quality

University of California San Diego

Computers have helped researchers develop a new phosphor that can make LEDs cheaper and render colors more accurately. An international team led by engineers at UC San Diego first predicted the new phosphor using supercomputers and data mining algorithms, then developed a simple recipe to make it in the lab. Unlike many phosphors, this one is made of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements and can easily be made using industrial methods. As computers predicted, the new phosphor performed well in tests and in LED prototypes.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 2:25 PM EST
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