Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

5160 of 1687
Alex-biris_nanotech.jpg

Article ID: 686604

Researchers Save Baby Alpaca Through Device to Speed Bone Regeneration

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Researchers at the Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, helped saved the life of an injured baby alpaca using the NuCress™ scaffold, a nanomaterial-based bone regeneration device.

Released:
11-Dec-2017 1:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment
Version_Three1copy.jpg

Article ID: 686333

Scientists Craft World’s Tiniest Interlinking Chains

University of Chicago

For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published online Nov. 30, University of Chicago researchers announced the first confirmed method to craft such a molecular chain.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 2:30 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Energy, Engineering, Materials Science, Physics, Chemistry, Nanotechnology, DOE Science News, Local - Illinois, All Journal News

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 686282

Bioelectronic ‘Nose’ Can Detect Food Spoilage by Sensing the Smell of Death

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano, researchers have developed a bioelectronic “nose” that can specifically detect a key decay compound at low levels, enabling people to potentially take action before the stink spreads. It can detect rotting food, as well as be used to help find victims of natural disasters or crimes.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 9:45 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites

Channels:

Chemistry, Food and Water Safety, Food Science, Nanotechnology, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro, All Journal News

LisaWeiss-Portraitphoto.jpg

Article ID: 686271

Nanomaterials: How to Separate Linear and Ring-Shaped Molecules

University of Vienna

What is the difference between linear chains and rings composed of the same material? The molecular building blocks are identical, but from a mathematical point of view the two structures have distinct topologies, namely ring and linear chain. This difference is readily recognizable on a macroscopic scale, as for example a golden ring and a gold bar, but represents a tricky task on the microscopic scale. The physicists Lisa Weiss and Christos Likos of the University of Vienna and Arash Nikoubashman of the Johannes-Gutenberg University of Mainz investigated strategies to separate nano- and microparticles of distinct topology. Their results are published in the high-impact journal ACS Macro Letters.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 5:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 686216

Hybrid Electrolyte Enhances Supercapacitance in Vertical Graphene Nanosheets

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets that are larger and positioned closer together. Using VGNs as the material for supercapacitor electrodes offers advantages due to their intriguing properties, and those advantages can be enhanced depending on how the material is grown, treated and prepared to work with electrolytes. In this week’s Journal of Applied Physics, researchers discuss their work to improve the material’s supercapacitance properties.

Released:
5-Dec-2017 1:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment
NanoES_ribboncutting_final.jpg

Article ID: 686214

Making humanity's challenges smaller and smaller: UW launches Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems

University of Washington

The University of Washington has launched a new institute aimed at accelerating research at the nanoscale: the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems, or NanoES. Housed in a new, multimillion-dollar facility on the UW's Seattle campus, the institute will pursue impactful advancements in a variety of disciplines — including energy, materials science, computation and medicine.

Released:
5-Dec-2017 12:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment
Nanotweezersnewsreleaseimage1.jpg

Article ID: 686019

Researchers Develop Graphene Nano ‘Tweezers’ That Can Grab Individual Biomolecules

University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene—tiny electronic “tweezers” that can grab individual biomolecules with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phone.

Released:
30-Nov-2017 5:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

All Journal News, Engineering, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Nature (journal)

APLM-Kim-nanoswimmers1.jpg

Article ID: 685991

Going Swimmingly: Biotemplates Breakthrough Paves Way for Cheaper Nanobots

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

New developments may now propel nanoswimmers from science fiction to reality thanks to unexpected help from bacteria. An international research team has demonstrated a new technique for plating silica onto flagella, the helix-shaped tails found on many bacteria, to produce nanoscale swimming robots. As reported this week in APL Materials, the group’s biotemplated nanoswimmers spin their flagella thanks to rotating magnetic fields and can perform nearly as well as living bacteria.

Released:
30-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 685914

Three Elected Foreign Members of Chinese Academy of Sciences

Northwestern University

In a rare honor for an American university, three Northwestern University scientists — Sir Fraser Stoddart, Chad Mirkin and Yonggang Huang — have been elected foreign members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The three were selected for their scientific achievements and contributions to promoting the development of science and technology in China.

Released:
29-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Chemistry, Engineering, Nanotechnology, Local - Illinois, Local - Chicago Metro

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 685879

A Transistor of Graphene Nanoribbons

Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Released:
29-Nov-2017 10:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

All Journal News, Energy, Materials Science, Nanotechnology, Nature (journal), DOE Science News


Showing results

5160 of 1687





Chat now!