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Science

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Graphene, Physics, Science, Nanotechnology, Technology, Electrons, Electronics, Transistors, Computers, Amplifiers, supercapacitors, Carbon, Graphite, Energy, nano, scanning tunneling microscope, Microscopes, Nanowires, Optical, Lense, Rutgers, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, New Jersey, NJ

Taming ‘Wild’ Electrons in Graphene

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Graphene – a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils – is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can’t be stopped. Until now, that is. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have learned how to tame the unruly electrons in graphene, paving the way for the ultra-fast transport of electrons with low loss of energy in novel systems. Their study was published online in Nature Nanotechnology.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL, CNMS, Center for Nanonphase Materials Science, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Plasmonics, plasmonic structures, nanoscale 3D printing, Nanoscience, nanosciences, Nanotechnology, Nanotechnologies, Health, 3D printing, 3D printing

On-Demand 3-D Printing of Tiny Magic Wands

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Direct writing of pure-metal structures may advance novel light sources, sensors and information storage technologies.

Science

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Northwestern University, Honors, Awards, Mirkin, exner medal, Nanotechnology

Chad Mirkin receives 2017 Wilhelm Exner Medal in Austria

Northwestern University’s Chad A. Mirkin received a prestigious 2017 Wilhelm Exner Medal at an award ceremony at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna on Oct. 19.

Science

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optoelectronic device, tunnel junctions, Plasmonics, Electricity

Novel “Converter” Invented by NUS Scientists Heralds Breakthrough in Ultra-Fast Data Processing at Nanoscale

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A research team from the National University of Singapore has recently invented a novel “converter” that can harness the speed and small size of plasmons for high frequency data processing and transmission in nanoelectronics.

Medicine

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Shawn Yu Lin, parallel to interface refraction, Negative Refraction

Extreme Light Trapping

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Shawn-Yu Lin, professor of physics, applied physics, and astronomy at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has built a nanostructure whose crystal lattice bends light as it enters the material and directs it in a path parallel to the surface, known as “parallel to interface refraction.”

Science

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Spintronics, 2D materials, nano devices, memory storage, Information Processing

Two-Dimensional Materials Gets a New Theory for Control of Properties

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A theoretical method to control grain boundaries in two-dimensional materials could result in desirable properties, such as increased electrical conductivity, improved mechanical properties, or magnetism.

Medicine

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Nanomedicine, Nanotechnology, Biomedical Engineering, Nanoparticle, Nanopore, Cancer

Nanomedicine Researchers Target Disease at the Molecular Level

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It’s truly small-scale work. But researchers in nanomedicine – the study, development and application of materials under 100 nanometers in size to diagnose and treat disease – are making some big-time advances.

Science

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Star Wars, ACS Nano, Sperm

How a ‘Star Wars’ Parody Turned Into a Tool for Scientific Discovery (Video)

Science has long inspired the arts, but examples of the reverse scenario are sparse. Now scientists who set out to produce a “Star Wars” parody have inadvertently created such an example. Incorporating animation techniques from the film industry, the researchers developed a robust new modeling tool that could help spur new molecular discoveries. Their project, reported in ACS Nano,resulted in a short film about fertilization called “The Beginning.”For a look behind-the-scenes, watch ACS' Headline Science video.

Science

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Energy, Energy efficiency , Vehicles, automotive engineering, Hybrid & electric vehicles, Powertrain research, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear energy modeling & simulation, Nuclear reactor safety, energy usage, Energy Storage, Batteries, Lithium-ion batteries , Catalysis & energy conversion, Materials Science, Nanoscience, Technology Transfer, Awards

Department of Energy Awards Flow Into Argonne

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DOE Secretary Rick Perry awarded Argonne with nearly $4.7 million in projects as part of the DOE’s Office of Technology Transition’s Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) in September.

Science

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nanotechnnology, Quantum Dots, Energy

Chemical Treatment Improves Quantum Dot Lasers

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One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or “doped,” with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.







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