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Environmental Health

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Science

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Bio Fuels, wood pellet, Energy, Biomass fuels, coal

Biomass-Produced Electricity in the US Possible, but It’ll Cost

If the U.S. wants to start using wood pellets to produce energy, either the government or power customers will have to pay an extra cost, a new University of Georgia study has found.

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When Residents Take Charge of Their Rainforests, Fewer Trees Die

When the government gives citizens a personal stake in forested land, trees don’t disappear as quickly and environmental harm slows down.

Medicine

Science

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Liver Disease, Fatty Liver, Environment, Pollution, endocrine-disrupting chemicals, Gastroenterology, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

UofL Gastroenterology Researcher Receives $4 Million From NIH for Innovative Liver Research

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UofL gastroenterologist Matthew Cave, M.D., believes that chemicals we breathe, consume or come in contact with in the environment may be contributing to liver disease. He has been awarded $4 million by the NIEHS to explore the effects of environmental chemicals on the liver.

Medicine

Science

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Gulf Long-term Follow-up Study, GuLF STUDY, 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Cleanup Workers, Heatlh, Health Effects, Dispersants, Corexit EC9500A, Corexit EC9527A, National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs

Gulf Spill Oil Dispersants Associated with Health Symptoms in Cleanup Workers

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Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study appeared online Sept. 15 in Environmental Health Perspectives and is the first research to examine dispersant-related health symptoms in humans.

Science

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Hurricane, Missouri S&T, Environmental Health

Environmental Health Expert Available to Discuss Hurricane Jose, Maria Threats to the Carribean, Puerto Rico and East Coast

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Pipeline Denial Important Step Away From Shale Gas

Science

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Environmental Justice, Air Pollution, Public Health, No2 disparities

People of Color Exposed to More Pollution From Cars, Trucks, Power Plants During 10-Year Period

A new nationwide study finds that the U.S. made little progress from 2000 to 2010 in reducing relative disparities between people of color and whites in exposure to harmful air pollution emitted by cars, trucks and other combustion sources. While absolute differences in exposure to the air pollutant dropped noticeably for all populations, the gap between pollution levels to which white people and people of color were exposed narrowed only a little.

Science

Life

Arts and Humanities

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English, Humanities, Environment, Climate Change, Waste

Discovering the Art of Waste

Stephanie Foote is the first West Virginia University faculty member to be chosen for a National Humanities Center Fellowship. Foote is in residence at the National Humanities Center in Durham, N.C. for the 2017-18 academic year while working on her book about waste.

Medicine

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Folic Acid, Autism, Pesticide Exposure, UC Davis MIND Institute

Folic Acid May Mitigate Autism Risk From Pesticides

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Researchers at UC Davis and other institutions have shown that mothers who take recommended amounts of folic acid around conception might reduce their children’s pesticide-related autism risk.

Medicine

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Dermatology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Vitamin D, mustard gas, chemical threats, National Institutes of Health, NIH Award, toxic exosure, immune system response, Chemical Weapons, NIH countermeasures against chemical threats, counteract, Skin Repair, toxic chemical exposure

CWRU’s Kurt Lu, MD Receives $3.9 Million NIH Grant to Expand Countermeasures against Chemical Threats, Including Mustard Gas

Kurt Lu, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has received a five year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand countermeasures against chemical threats, including mustard gas and mustard-related compounds. The molecular action of mustard on DNA leads to strand breaks and eventual cell death. The goal of the grant is to augment the body’s immune system after exposure, reducing skin swelling and pain as well as enhancing tissue repair.







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