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Medicine

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Professor's Football Research Emphasizes Lower Extremity Loading Patterns, Torque Production and Velocity-Based Resistance Training

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Medicine

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concussion and soccer ball heading, concussion and heading, concussion and soccer, Concussion, head impacts and soccer ball heading, Traumatic Head Injury

Soccer Ball Heading May Commonly Cause Concussion Symptoms

Frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under recognized cause of concussion symptoms, according to a study of amateur players led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers. The findings run counter to earlier soccer studies suggesting concussion injuries mainly result from inadvertent head impacts, such as collisions with other players or a goalpost. The study was published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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physical activity and weight control, Obesity, Exercise, Physical Activity, BMI

Loyola Study Provides New Evidence That Exercise Is Not Key to Weight Control

An international study led by Loyola University Chicago is providing compelling new evidence that exercise may not be the key to controlling weight. Neither physical activity nor sedentary time were associated with weight gain. The study is published in the journal PeerJ.

Medicine

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Physiology, Heat Stress, Heat Exposure, Hyperthermia, Exercise capacity, Exercise Physiology, Exercise, Blood Flow

Whole-Body Heat Stress Lowers Exercise Capacity, Blood Flow in Men

Researchers have found that prolonged exposure to high temperatures can raise both the skin and core temperature, reducing blood flow to the brain and limbs during exercise and limiting the ability to exercise for long periods. The study, the first of its kind to separate the effects of skin- versus internal-raised temperature (hyperthermia), is published in Physiological Reports.

Medicine

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Super Bowl foods, Calorie Literacy, Exercise Equivalents

Super Bowl 2017 "Big Game" Calorie Costs in Exercise

Director of the New York City Food Policy Center at HUNTER College Dr. Charles Platkin Shows Big Game Activities to Burn off Foods You Just Ate - Is it Splurge-worthy? Since a calorie doesn’t mean much to the average person, the idea is to use exercise equivalents to provide a frame of reference that is familiar and meaningful and thus help improve calorie literacy.

Medicine

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Metabolism, sanford burnham prebys, Dr. Muthu Periasamy, Cold Weather, Obesity, Diabetes, sarcolipin

Brrrr...it's WINTER. Can Being Cold Really Help You Burn Calories and Slim Down? An #SBP Researcher Weighs In

Medicine

Science

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New Study Connects Running Motion to Ground Force, Provides Patterns for Any Runner

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Concise scientific approach accurately predicts runner's patterns of foot ground-force application -- at all speeds and regardless of foot-strike mechanics

Life

Education

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fitness and college, GPA, Iron Deficiency, University Of Nebraska Lincoln, Pennsylvania State University

Better Grades Linked to Fitness and Iron Levels in Female Students, Study Shows

An analysis of 105 female college students showed that those with the highest levels of stored iron and the highest fitness levels had better grades than less-fit women with lower iron stores.

Medicine

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Physical Activity, Gym Membership, health benefits of exercise

To Improve Health and Exercise More, Get a Gym Membership, Iowa State Study Suggests

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If your New Year’s resolution was to exercise more in 2017, chances are you’ve already given up or you’re on the verge of doing so. To reach your goal, you may want to consider joining a gym, based on the results of a new study from a team of Iowa State University researchers.

Medicine

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Sleep, Neurology, New Year's Resolutions, Weight, Smoking, Exercise

Want to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions? Get More Sleep

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Making New Year’s resolutions is easy. Keeping them — beyond a couple of weeks, at least — is tough. One big factor that affects whether the commitment sticks: sleep. A sleep expert and neurologist explains how better sleep can help you keep those resolutions, including eating healthier, exercising more and getting a promotion.







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