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Article ID: 675218

How X-Rays Helped to Solve Mystery of Floating Rocks

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Experiments at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source have helped scientists to solve a mystery of why some rocks can float for years in the ocean, traveling thousands of miles before sinking.

Released:
23-May-2017 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 674996

WVU Professor’s Patented System Could Save Lives and Make Cities More Resilient After Natural Disasters

West Virginia University

West Virginia University professor Hota GangaRao and Praveen Majjigapu, a Ph.D. student in civil engineering, have developed a system that will increase the strength and endurance of structures in earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and other large blasts, helping communities prevent catastrophe. The system is also beneficial for repairing historic or aging structures.

Released:
18-May-2017 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 673950

Geologists Use Radioactive Clock to Document Longest Earthquake Record

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Using radioactive elements trapped in crystallized, cream-colored “veins” in New Mexican rock, geologists have peered back in time more than 400,000 years to illuminate a record of earthquakes along the Loma Blanca fault in the Rio Grande rift. It is the longest record of earthquakes ever documented on a fault.

Released:
2-May-2017 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 671978

A Seismic Mapping Milestone

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Using advanced modeling and simulation, seismic data generated by earthquakes, and one of the world’s fastest supercomputers, a team led by Jeroen Tromp of Princeton University is creating a detailed 3-D picture of Earth’s interior. Currently, the team is focused on imaging the entire globe from the surface to the core–mantle boundary, a depth of 1,800 miles.

Released:
28-Mar-2017 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 671979

Using a Method From Wall Street to Track Slow Slipping of Earth’s Crust

University of Washington

An algorithm for stock prices can be used with GPS data to automatically detect slow-slip earthquakes at a single station, offering a new way to monitor seismic activity.

Released:
28-Mar-2017 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 671659

Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands Tied to Ancient Quakes

California State University, Fullerton

When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.

Released:
22-Mar-2017 1:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 670956

Expert Available to Discuss New Findings About Southern California’s Earthquake Risk

Northern Arizona University

Released:
9-Mar-2017 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 670733

Fault System Off San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles Counties Could Produce Magnitude 7.3 Quake

University of California San Diego

The Newport-Inglewood and Rose Canyon faults had been considered separate systems but a new study shows that they are actually one continuous fault system running from San Diego Bay to Seal Beach in Orange County, then on land through the Los Angeles basin.

Released:
7-Mar-2017 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 670604

SDSC Achieves Record Performance in Seismic Simulations with Intel

University of California San Diego

Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego have developed a new seismic software package with Intel Corporation that has enabled the fastest seismic simulation to-date, as the two organizations collaborate on ways to better predict ground motions to save lives and minimize property damage.

Released:
6-Mar-2017 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jan-2017 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 667385

Release of Water Shakes Pacific Plate at Depth

Washington University in St. Louis

A team of seismologists analyzing the data from 671 earthquakes that occurred between 30 and 280 miles beneath the Earth's surface in the Pacific Plate as it descended into the Tonga Trench were surprised to find a zone of intense earthquake activity in the downgoing slab. The pattern of the activity along the slab provided strong evidence that the earthquakes are sparked by the release of water at depth.

Released:
9-Jan-2017 3:05 PM EST
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