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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Heart Disease, gap junctions, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Microscopic Spaces Between Heart Cells May Play Role in Sudden Cardiac Death

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Sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure is a major concern in the United States. A Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute team will investigate how the microscopic spaces surrounding heart cells affect connections called gap junctions.

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The Society of Thoracic Surgeons 53rd Annual Meeting

Media Advisory: Register for STS Annual Meeting and Press Conference

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Credentialed press representatives are invited to attend The Society of Thoracic Surgeons 53rd Annual Meeting, Exhibition, and Press Conference, which will include late-breaking scientific research, thought-provoking lectures, cutting-edge technologies, and innovative cardiothoracic surgery products—some that are not yet available on the market. Cardiothoracic surgeons and other health care experts also will provide an update on Mycobacterium chimaera infections related to heater-cooler devices used in cardiac surgery.

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As Neighborhood Status Falls, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among Black Residents Spikes

The lower a neighborhood’s socioeconomic status is, the more likely its black residents are to develop heart disease and stroke, according to a new Drexel University-led public health study.

Medicine

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heart recovery, Cardiac Recovery

Fixing Failing Hearts: National Leaders to Convene at Heart Recovery “Think Tank”

Can a failing heart recover? For many years, the answer to that question was unequivocally “No.” But as the University of Utah School of Medicine’s annual Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium (U-CARS) will explore on Jan. 12-13, advances in treating heart failure are giving physicians, surgeons and researchers reason to hope the deadly disease might one day be defeated. Watch the symposium live online at http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/guvl3

Medicine

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ICD, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, Cardiovacular Disease, Heart Failure, Cardiology

New Study Highlights the Benefit of the Use of ICD for Reducing Mortality Rate in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

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The UAB study, an updated meta-analysis of the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, provides further support to the current American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology guidelines and challenges the recently published DANISH trial

Medicine

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Regenerative Medicine Is Likely Game Changer for Cardiovascular Disease

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Regenerative medicine has much to offer the cardiovascular field, although there is still a way to go before it is ready for routine clinical application, according to Andre Terzic, MD, PhD, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine and a professor in Cardiovascular Diseases Research at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn.

Medicine

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Heart Desease, Anemia, Myocardial Infarction

Preventing Mortality After Myocardial Infarction

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is funding Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction.

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Novel Tests Published in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Could Improve Treatment for Heart Failure Patients

For the first time, researchers have developed tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients by diagnosing the condition with greater accuracy, as well as by detecting the onset of congestive heart failure earlier. The findings were published in the Cardiovascular Disease issue of Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC.

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Breaking Research Published in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Could Reduce Recurrence of Heart Attacks, Death in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

Research published today in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry journal shows that a test can identify patients with a history of cardiovascular disease who are at high risk of another heart attack or death and would benefit from treatment with the drug vorapaxar. This study and two others on tests that predict risk of adverse cardiovascular events are featured in the Cardiovascular Disease issue of Clinical Chemistry.

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January Issue of AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Highlights the Breakthrough Medical Tests That Will Advance Cardiovascular Care

Laboratory medicine experts are using a growing understanding of the molecular signatures of heart disease to develop more precise tests for the early diagnosis, monitoring, and targeted treatment of this condition. A special issue of Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC, titled “Cardiovascular Disease: Impact of Biomarkers, Proteomics, and Genomics,” highlights the groundbreaking medical tests that could advance patient care for this chronic disease and its consequences, which range from cardiac arrest to congestive heart failure.

Medicine

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Cariovascular, Obesity, Weight Loss

Weight Loss and Its Cardiovascular Benefits Continue for Five Years in Real-World Clinical Practice

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Participants in Joslin's Why WAIT (Weight Achievement and Intensive Management) program lost substantial amounts of weight, and even those who maintained relatively little loss of weight after five years demonstrated reduced risks of cardiovascular disease.

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Study Suggests Route to Improve Artery Repair

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People with any form of diabetes are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular conditions than people without the disease. Moreover, if they undergo an operation to open up a clogged artery by inserting a “stent” surgical tube, the artery is much more likely to clog up again. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Centers now have uncovered an explanation for why these procedures often fail, which may lead toward better alternatives.

Medicine

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Afib, Atrial fibrilation, EP, Arrhythmia, Stroke, Warfarin, electrical cardioversion, Radiofrequency Ablation

Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

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Anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, but a new study shows many people don’t stick with it.

Medicine

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Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, CardioVascual Institution, Affordable Care Act (ACA), Healthcare Costs, Hospital Readmission Rates

Study: Hospital Readmission Rates Decrease Following Passage of Affordable Care Act Financial Penalties

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) instituted financial penalties against hospitals with high rates of readmissions for Medicare patients with certain health conditions. A new analysis led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital has found that the penalties levied under the law’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program were associated with reduced readmissions rates and that the poorest performing hospitals achieved the greatest reductions.

Medicine

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Cardiac, Stem Cell, Synthetic

Synthetic Stem Cells Could Offer Therapeutic Benefits, Reduced Risks

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Researchers have developed a synthetic version of a cardiac stem cell. These synthetic stem cells offer therapeutic benefits comparable to those from natural stem cells and could reduce some of the risks associated with stem cell therapies.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, cardiovascular disease risk factors, rotator cuff tendinopathy, Shoulder Pain

Shoulder Pain Linked to Increased Heart Disease Risk

After all the lifting, hauling and wrapping, worn out gift givers may blame the season’s physical strain for any shoulder soreness they are feeling. It turns out there could be another reason. A new study led by investigators at the University of Utah School of Medicine finds that individuals with symptoms that put them at increased risk for heart disease could be more likely to have shoulder problems, including joint pain and rotator cuff injury.

Medicine

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J-CHiP, Scott Berkowitz, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Hospitals, Community, Super Aspirin

Hopkins Project Shows House Calls and Good Neighbors Can Benefit Patients and Hospitals

When people with chronic health problems couldn't get around town to their doctors' appointments, a four-year Johns Hopkins program brought the appointments to them. Johns Hopkins cardiologist and senior director for accountable care Scott Berkowitz, M.D., has published an extensive report of a four-year, $19 million Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services grant in the journal Healthcare.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease, Autonomic Nervous System

With $8.6 Million Grant From Nih, UCLA-Led Consortium Will Map the Heart’s Nervous System

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A consortium directed by UCLA’s Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar has received a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to map the heart’s nervous system. The group’s goal: To conduct research that leads to new ways to treat cardiovascular disease by targeting nerves in the heart’s nervous system.

Medicine

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Embryonic Stem Cells, Stem Cells, Cardiomyocytes, Pacemaker Cells, Pacemaker, Israel, Biological Pacemaker, Cardiovascular

Canadian-Israeli Development: A New Biological Pacemaker

Using human embryonic stem cells to create a type of cardiac cells known as sinotrial (SA) node pacemaker cells, researchers have developed a biological pacemaker that overcomes many of the limitations of electrical pacemakers.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular disease (CVD), Cardiology, TAVR, TAVR procedure, structural heart disease, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Attack

UAB’s 500th TAVR Procedure Gives Retired Pastor, Baseball Player Opportunity to Help Others

UAB is the only hospital in Alabama to perform 500 TAVR cases.







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