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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Kenneth Davis, Healthfirst, CMS, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Medicare, HMO, Health Insurance, Health Benefits, health insurance marketplaces

Mount Sinai and Healthfirst® Provide Co-branded Plan for this Annual Enrollment Season for Medicare Beneficiaries in New York City

The Mount Sinai Health System and Healthfirst are, for the third year, teaming up to provide their co-branded Medicare Advantage plan for Manhattan residents — the Healthfirst Mount Sinai Select (HMO) plan — during the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period.

Medicine

Channels:

Depression, Heart Disease, Fitness, Exercise, Cardiac Rehabilitation, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, American Heart Association, Heart Surgery

New Study Finds Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Helps Reduce Risk of Death in Depressed Heart Patients

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Depression has been known to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes, but if patients who are depressed attend cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery, their risk of death is significantly reduced, according to a new study.

Medicine

Channels:

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Angioplasty, Heparin, Tirofiban, periprocedural bivalirudin, Blood Clot, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, Bleeding, American Heart Association, american heart association scientific sessions

Two Differing Blood Clot Prevention Medications Used During Heart Procedure Are Both Safe and Effective for Patients, New Study Finds

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Two differing blood clot prevention medications are just as safe and effective for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, a non-surgical procedure to open blood vessels narrowed by plaque buildup, according to a new study.

Medicine

Channels:

Stroke, Catheter Ablation, intermountain medical center, American Heart Association, Research, Arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF), Science

Catheter Ablations Reduce Long-Term Risks of Stroke in Patients with Prior History of Stroke, New Study Finds

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Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation to treat the abnormal heart rhythm lower their long-term risk of a recurrent stroke by 50 percent, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute

Medicine

Channels:

ACR annual meeting, Cardiovascular Disease, CVD, Rheumatoid Arthritis, RA, inflammatory rheumatic diseases , anti-hyperintensive (anti-HT) , lipid-lowering therapies (LLT) , CVD-preventive measures, spondyloarthritis, Rheumatic Disease, Rheumatology, Ankylosing Spondylitis

Too Many Patients with Inflammatory Joint Diseases Undermanaged for Cardiovascular Disease Risk

While patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as RA or spondyloarthritis are at increased risk for CVD, too few are prescribed preventive medications or meeting target goals to prevent heart-related events, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.

Medicine

Channels:

ACR annual meeting, Rheumatoid Arthritis, CARDIOVASCULAR EVENT RISK , TO TYPE-2 DIABETES , TYPE-2 DIABETES, Cardiovascular Disease, CVD, Rheumatic Disease, Rheumatology

Cardiovascular Event Risk of Ra Patients Comparable to Persons with Type-2 Diabetes Over a 15-Year Period

Over a 15-year period, people with RA may have double the risk of CV events as those in the general population, rates that are similar to people with type-2 diabetes, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.

Medicine

Channels:

ACR annual meeting, myocardial inflammation, Rheumatic Disease, Rheumatoid Arthris, cardiovascuar disease, Disease Modifying Drugs, Dmard, DMARDs, Rheumatology, RA, Coronary Artery Disease, CVD, articular inflammation

Myocardial Inflammation Elevated in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients, but Disease-Modifying Therapy Can Improve It

Two new studies measure the prevalence of myocardial inflammation in RA patients without known cardiovascular disease, assess how it is associated with high disease activity and show how disease-modifying therapy may decrease this type of inflammation, according to new research findings presented this week at the ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiopulmonary, Neurology

Bystander CPR Improves Survival, Neurological Outcomes in U.S. Children

Children who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are more likely to survive, and to have better neurological outcomes, when they receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Researchers studying a large U.S. registry of cardiac arrests compared outcomes for two bystander resuscitation techniques, and also recommend improving provision of bystander CPR in minority communities to improve outcomes in children.

Medicine

Channels:

Mycobacterium Chimaera Infections, Heater-Cooler Devices, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Joint Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery Society Statement on Mycobacterium Chimaera Infections Related to Heater-Cooler Devices Used in Cardiac Surgery

The worldwide cardiothoracic surgery community is aware of the public health issue with recent heater-cooler infection findings traced to a manufacturing facility and has actively engaged in understanding the cause and developing measures to lower the risk and occurrences of these infections.

Medicine

Channels:

Interventional Cardiology, structural heart disease, Cardiology, Journals, valvular heart disease, Left Atrial Appendage, myocardial disease, Congenital Heart Disease

CRF to Launch New Journal Focusing on Structural Heart Disease

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced that it will launch a new international journal focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of structural heart disease and the importance of the heart team in managing these disorders.

Medicine

Channels:

Mount Sinai Health System, Mount Sinai Heart, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Cardiology, American Heart Association

Mount Sinai Heart Presents Late-Breaking Clinical Trials and Research at AHA 2016

Physicians, fellows, and researchers from Mount Sinai Health System are presenting late-breaking clinical trials and research updates at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, LA, November 12-15, 2016.

Science

Channels:

Ut Southwestern, Aorta, aortic rigidity, Dallas Heart Study, Cardiovascular Disease, African American health disparities

Major Artery More Rigid in African-Americans, Which May Explain High Rates of Hypertension and Heart Disease

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African-Americans have more rigidity of the aorta, the major artery supplying oxygen-rich blood to the body, than Caucasians and Hispanics, according to a study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists.

Medicine

Channels:

Network, Social Network, Cardiac Surgery, Health Outcomes, physician networks, Ethnography, Medicare

Social Networking by Doctors May Save Patients’ Lives, Study Suggests

A new study finds that heart surgery patients’ chances of survival depends in part on the overall previous level of teamwork among all the physicians who cared for them across their surgery preparation, operation, hospitalization and recuperation.

Medicine

Channels:

Mount Sinai Heart, Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Cardiac, Statin Drugs

Mount Sinai Researchers Find Improved Cholesterol Efflux Linked to Plaque Stabilization in Statin-Treated Patients

A new study of patients treated with intensive statin therapy reveals intracoronary imaging evidence of plaque stabilization associated with improved cholesterol transport and distinct transcriptomic perturbations

Medicine

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Exercise Program Improved Testosterone Levels in Obese Men, Dad’s Preconception Exercise May Increase Obesity, Women Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease After Weight-Loss Surgery Than Men, and More in the Obesity News Source

The latest research and features on obesity in the Obesity News Source.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Stent

Hybrid Sirolimus-Eluting Stents with Biodegradable Polymer Did Not Improve Angiographic Outcomes Compared to Everolimus-Eluting Stents with Durable Polymer in Treatment of Chronic Total Occlusions

Results from a randomized, multicenter trial failed to show non-inferiority of hybrid, ultra-thin strut sirolimus-eluting stents (Osiro SES) with a biodegradable polymer compared to thin-strut everolimus-eluting stents (Xience EES) with a durable polymer in terms of in-segment late lumen loss in successfully treated chronic total occlusions. In addition, although the rate of binary restenosis was low overall in this complex lesion subset, it was higher with the Osirio SES compared with the Xience EES.

Medicine

Channels:

Stroke, Cardiology, atrial fibrillation (AF)

Results From Real-World United States Post-FDA Approval Usage of the Watchman Device Presented at TCT 2016 and Published Simultaneously in JACC

Results from the U.S. real-world, post-FDA approval experience of the Watchman device found high procedural success and low complication rates despite implantations by a large percentage of new operators. The Watchman device was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 2015 for left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAC) to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF).

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Stent

Imaging Study Shows High Rate of Strut Coverage and Low Rates of Neoatherosclerosis with Thin Strut Bioresorbable Polymer-Based and Durable Polymer-Based Drug-Eluting Stents

Results from TRANSFORM-OCT, a prospective, randomized trial using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate strut coverage and neoatherosclerosis (NA) found that bioresorbable polymer-based drug-eluting stents (BP-EES) are comparable to durable polymer-based drug-eluting stents (DP-ZES).

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Stroke, Altitude Sickness, Mountain Sickness, Mountaineering, Genetics, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Sports Medicine, Quality Of Life

Andeans with Altitude Sickness Produce Massive Amounts of Red Blood Cells

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To better understand why some people adapt well to life at high altitude while others don’t, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine studied red blood cells derived from representatives of both groups living in the Andes Mountains. The study reveals that high-altitude, low-oxygen dwellers prone to chronic mountain sickness produce massive amounts of red blood cells thanks to overproduction of the enzyme SENP1.

Medicine

Business

Channels:

Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, CardioVascual Institution, Cardiology, outpatient care

Opening of Cardiac Direct Access Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Transforms Cardiac Care in New England

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The CardioVascular Institute (CVI) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has transformed the delivery of cardiac care with the opening of the new Cardiac Direct Access Unit (CDAc). The first of its kind in New England, the outpatient unit offers immediate evaluation and care, allowing many individuals with heart conditions to avoid preventable and costly Emergency Department visits.







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