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Science

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Japan, Earthquake, Tsunami, Public Health, Shinto, Buddhism, Tectonic, Nuclear, Japanese, Nuclear Facilities, Disaster, Seismic, Ocean, Waves, Geologic, Florida State University, Fault, structural geology, Plates, Oceanographic, FSU

Earthquake, Tsunami Experts at Florida State University

The Florida State University has internationally recognized faculty researchers who stand ready to comment on a variety of topics related to the March 11 Japanese earthquake and resulting tsunami. The following experts are available to speak with the news media on potential dangers at Japan’s nuclear facilities, the physical processes that underlie the formation of a tsunami, the challenges that the public health sector faces in the coming hours and days, and how religion figures in to the way the Japanese people react to and deal with a disaster of this magnitude.

Science

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Earthquake, Japan, Tsunami, Expert, Seismic

Earthquake Expert Explains the Science of Japan Tsunami

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An earthquake expert at Michigan Technological University can explain the phenomenon of the life-threatening tsunami that often follows a major earthquake.

Science

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Japan, Earthquake, MAP, Aftershocks, real-time

Researchers Create Near-Real-Time Map of Japan Quake Aftershocks

The news media can use images from this map with proper attribution.

Science

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Earthquake, Earthquake Building Codes, earthquake engineering, Earthquake Research, Engineering, Structural Engineering, Structual

Internationally-Renowned Earthquake Expert at University of Alabama

Dr. John van de Lindt, professor of structural engineering at The University of Alabama, has vast experience with building structures and earthquakes. He has done extensive research in Japan, Chile and the US West Coast.

Science

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Earthquake, Tectonic Plates, Seismometers, Japan, Study Abroad

Columbus State University Sources on Japanese Earthquake, Which Was Literally Felt in Georgia

Columbus State University in Georgia offers several sources on the Japan earthquake, recorded the quake on a seismometer, and has students there now (all are OK).

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Expert Available to Discuss Japan Earthquake

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For questions about damage to buildings and infrastructure due to the earthquake in Japan, please contact Brady Cox, assistant professor of civil engineering at the University of Arkansas. A geotechnical engineer, Cox specializes in issues related to earthquake loading, soil dynamics and material characterization and response to stress waves.

Science

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Earthquake, Tsunami, Earthquake Prediction, Japan, AL, Geology, Geodynamics

Tsunami and Earthquake Source Available

A geologist who develops mathematical models to depict precisely how the Earth moves during a quake and who was among the first to survey the origin of the 2004-tsunami-triggering earthquake, deep beneath the Indian Ocean, is available to answer questions about today’s quake and resulting tsunami.

Science

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Tsunami, Earthquake, Japan earthquake, Nuclear Accident

Japan Earthquake Could Cause Global Economic Fallout

Thomas D. O’Rourke, earthquake expert and professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University, comments on the massive earthquake in Japan and its impact on infrastructure. O’Rourke is a member of the Advisory Committee for Earthquake Hazard Reduction, which is the national advisory committee for earthquakes in the U.S. NOTE: Prof. O’Rourke is available for on-camera interviews

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First Responders, Homeland Security, Science And Technology Directorate, Social Media

First Responders and Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate Launch a Virtual Social Media Working Group

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The DHS Science and Technology Directorate's First Responder Communities of Practice* launches a Virtual Social Media Working Group (VSMWG) to provide recommendations to the emergency preparedness, response, and homeland security communities on the safe and sustainable use of social media technologies before, during, and after emergencies.

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Alaska, Alaskan , black spruce, Forests, Climate Change, Carbon Emissions, Greenhouse Gas, Forest Fires

Frequent, Severe Fires Turn Alaskan Forests into a Carbon Production Line

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Alaskan forests used to be key players in Mother Nature’s game plan for regulating carbon dioxide levels in the air. But now, American and Canadian researchers report that climate change is causing wildfires to burn more widely and severely, turning Alaska's black spruce forests from carbon repositories to generators of it.







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