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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 584157

‘Rare’ Brain Disorder May Be More Common Than Thought

Mayo Clinic

A global team of neuroscientists, led by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida, have found the gene responsible for a brain disorder that may be much more common than once believed.

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19-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 584325

Sea Snails Help Scientists Explore a Possible Way to Enhance Memory

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Efforts to help people with learning impairments are being aided by a species of sea snail known as Aplysia californica. The mollusk, which is used by researchers to study the brain, has much in common with other species including humans. Research involving the snail has contributed to the understanding of learning and memory. At The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), neuroscientists used this animal model to test an innovative learning strategy designed to help improve the brain’s memory and the results were encouraging.

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25-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Dec-2011 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 584235

Long Intervening Non-Coding RNAs Play Pivotal Roles in Brain Development

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Whitehead Institute scientists have identified conserved, long intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) that play key roles during brain development in zebrafish, and went on to show that the human versions of these RNAs can substitute for the zebrafish lincRNAs.

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21-Dec-2011 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Dec-2011 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 583966

Brain Size May Predict Risk for Early Alzheimer’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

New research suggests that, in people who don’t currently have memory problems, those with smaller regions of the brain’s cortex may be more likely to develop symptoms consistent with very early Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in the December 21, 2011, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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13-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 584195

Study Could Lead to a Treatment for Angelman Syndrome

University of North Carolina Health Care System

An interdisciplinary team of UNC scientists say they have found a way to “awaken” the paternal allele of Ube3a, which could lead to a potential treatment strategy for AS. Their results were published online by the journal Nature.

Released:
20-Dec-2011 11:30 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Dec-2011 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 584018

Innovative New Strategy to Treat Parkinson’s Disease

The Rockefeller University Press

Stabilizing the cell’s power-generating center protects against Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a rat model, according to a report published online this week in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Released:
14-Dec-2011 11:45 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Dec-2011 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 583993

Researchers Slow Progression of Huntington’s Disease in Mouse Models

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that a gene (SIRT1) linked to slowing the aging process in cells also appears to dramatically delay the onset of Huntington’s disease (HD) and slow the progression of the relentless neurodegenerative disorder.

Released:
14-Dec-2011 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 584119

Team Discovers Cause of Rare Disease Childhood Disorder Called PKD Linked to Genetic Mutations

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

A large, international team of researchers led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco has identified the gene that causes a rare childhood neurological disorder called PKD/IC, or “paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions,” a cause of epilepsy in babies and movement disorders in older children.

Released:
16-Dec-2011 12:20 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Dec-2011 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 583709

Magnetic Stimulation of Brain May Help Some Stroke Patients Recover

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Imagine waking up and being unable to see or recognize anything on the left side of your body. This condition, called hemispatial neglect, is common after a stroke that occurs on the right side of the brain. The current treatment of attention and concentration training using computer and pencil-and-paper tasks is inadequate.

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6-Dec-2011 2:25 PM EST
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Article ID: 584035

When Standard Treatment Fails: Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience to Start Unique Immunotherapy for Brain Tumor Patients

Thomas Jefferson University

Physicians at the Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience are tackling a particularly aggressive brain cancer that even surgery, chemotherapy and radiation often fail to treat with a promising new immunotherapy to attack a patient’s tumor with their own cancer cells.

Released:
14-Dec-2011 4:00 PM EST
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