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Medicine

Life

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diet fad, Feeding Tube, Wedding, Weight Loss

Diet Fad of "Eating Through the Nose" Could Be a Nightmare, Nutrition Expert Says

What should be a fairy-tale day — a woman’s wedding — could turn into a nightmare for a bride-to-be who goes on a new feeding-tube diet to lose 20 pounds fast, says a Baylor University professor and a former chair of a public policy committee for the American Dietetic Association.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Caregiving, Stress, Breast Cancer, Men's Health

Stress About Wife's Breast Cancer Can Harm a Man's Health

Caring for a wife with breast cancer can have a measurable negative effect on men’s health, even years after the cancer diagnosis and completion of treatment, according to recent research.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Human Behaviour, Human Nature, Evolutionary Biology, Email Communication, Romance, Nepotism, academic careers, Politics, Career Advancement, Evolution

A New Take on the Games People Play in Their Relationships

Human nature has deep evolutionary roots and is manifested in relationships with family members, friends, romantic and business partners, competitors, and strangers more than in any other aspects of behavior or intellectual activity. It is in party genetically controlled and evolves by natural selection, contends a behavioral biologist.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Women Happier in Relationships When Men Feel Their Pain

Men like to know when their wife or girlfriend is happy while women really want the man in their life to know when they are upset, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

Science

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love, Lovers, Friendship, Friendship Building, Attraction, Men Women Relationships

One-Way Romantic Attraction? Ways to Save Your Guy-Gal Friendship

When one friend admits they are “into” the other but the feeling isn't mutual, the relationship can indeed be in jeopardy. Friendships often dissolve under these circumstances, but not always, says Heidi Reeder, associate professor of communication at Boise State University.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Sex, human sexuality, Marital Happiness, Virginity, chastity, Flirtation, seduction, sexual integrity, Sex Education, Marriage

Book Describes Six Views on Human Sexuality

There are six "lenses" through which people view sexuality in our pluralistic society. Thus there are few shared understandings or "rules of engagement." This leads to pain and disappointment for many people.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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K-State, Kansas State University, Romance, Relationship, cyclical relationship, Dating, amber vennum

Passion Pitfall: Research Finds That Rekindling a Romance Often Extinguishes a Couple's Happiness

A study on couples who broke up and then got back together revealed that the couple had a lower level of happiness and self-esteem; were less satisfied with their partner and the relationship; had worse communication; and were more uncertain about their future together.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Valentine, Valentine's Day, Valentine's Day, teen dating, , Flirting, Ethics, ethical behavior, love, Cheating, Cheater, Lovers, Holiday, hallmark

Is Flirting Ethical? Philosophy Prof Explores the Possibilities

Love is in the air on Valentine's Day, and Gettysburg College philosophy professor Steve Gimbel is offering some ethical and practical advice on flirting to those of the faint of heart.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Lovelorn Liars Leave Linguistic Leads

Online daters intent on fudging their personal information have a big advantage: most people are terrible at identifying a liar. But new research is turning the tables on deceivers using their own words.

Medicine

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Vanderbilt, love, Chocolate, Heart, Relationship

Love, Chocolate Good for the Heart, Says Vanderbilt Cardiologist

Being involved in a healthy, loving relationship is good for the heart, says Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute cardiologist Julie Damp, M.D. “There are a couple of different theories behind why that might be,” Damp said. People who are married or who are in close, healthy relationships tend to be less likely to smoke, are more physically active and are more likely to have a well-developed social structure, she said. They are also more likely to have lower levels of stress and anxiety in their day-to-day lives.







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