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Science

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Nanoparticles, Nutrients, Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide, Food, Tomato, Tomato Plants, Energy, Water, food-water-energy nexus, Solar Cells

Tomatoes Get Boost in Growth, Antioxidants From Nano-Sized Nutrients

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Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis are working to increase nutrient content in fruits and vegetables by using nanoparticles to boost the nutrient content and growth of tomato plants.

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Center For Nanoscale Materials

Promising Technique Improves Hydrogen Production of Affordable Alternative to Platinum

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Scientists have demonstrated that microwaves can help create nanostructured molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalysts with an improved ability to produce hydrogen. The microwave-assisted strategy accomplishes this by increasing the space, and therefore decreasing the interaction, between individual layers of MoS2 nanosheets.

Science

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bees, Robots, Insects, Nanotechnology, driverless cars, Google, Lidar, Laser, Smartphones, Tablets, Wearable Technology, Endoscopy, Agriculture, Colony Collapse Disorder, Disaster Relief

Robot Bees Fly and Swim, Soon They’ll Have Laser Eyes

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Robot bees are capable of tethered flight and moving while submerged in water, but they can't sense what’s in front of them. The UB-led research team will address the limitation by outfitting the robot bee with remote sensing technology called lidar, the same laser-based sensor system that is making driverless cars possible.

Science

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AIP Publishing, Applied Physics Letters, Mutsuko Hatano, Tokyo Institute of Technology, diamond nanostructures , photon collectors , Quantum Computing, Magnetic Sensors, highly sensitive magnetic sensors , umbrella-shaped , quantum sensors , Life Science, medical applications

Catching the Light: Umbrella-Shaped Diamond Nanostructures Make Efficient Photon Collectors

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By tweaking the shape of the diamond nanostructures into the form of tiny umbrellas, researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology experimentally showed that the fluorescence intensity of their structures was three to five times greater than that of bulk diamond. They report their results in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Science

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graphene oxide, Nanomaterials, Nanomaterial, Flexible Electronics, Graphene, Solar Cells, biomedical instruments, Physics, Electrical Conductivity, Insulating, Research, eco-friendly, Environmentally Friendly, Carbon, lab-scale devices, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York

New Research Could Revolutionize Flexible Electronics, Solar Cells

Binghamton University researchers have demonstrated an eco-friendly process that enables unprecedented spatial control over the electrical properties of graphene oxide. This two-dimensional nanomaterial has the potential to revolutionize flexible electronics, solar cells and biomedical instruments. By using the probe of an atomic force microscope to trigger a local chemical reaction, Jeffrey Mativetsky, assistant professor of physics at Binghamton University, and PhD student Austin Faucett showed that electrically conductive features as small as four nanometers can be patterned into individual graphene oxide sheets. One nanometer is about one hundred thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair.

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One Direction: Researchers Grow Nanocircuitry with Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons

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Researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison are the first to grow self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium. This allows the semiconducting industry to tailor specific paths for nanocircuitry in their technologies. Confirmation of the findings was done at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

Science

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laser spectroscopy, materals science, Semiconductor, Ultrathin Films, particle physcis, trion, Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, Exciton, exciton detection, LED light, light emitting diode

Laser Spectroscopy of Ultrathin Semiconductor Reveals Rise of ‘Trion’ Quasiparticles

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Quasiparticles are central to energy applications but can be difficult to detect. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have seen evidence of quasiparticles called negative trions forming and fading in an ultrathin layer of semiconducting material.

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Nano Biotechnology

Newly Discovered ‘Design Rule’ Brings Nature-Inspired Nanostructures One Step Closer

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Scientists aspire to build nanostructures that mimic the complexity and function of nature’s proteins. These microscopic widgets could be customized into incredibly sensitive chemical detectors or long-lasting catalysts. But as with any craft that requires extreme precision, researchers must first learn how to finesse the materials they’ll use to build these structures. A discovery by Berkeley Lab scientists is a big step in this direction. The scientists discovered a design rule that enables a recently created material to exist.

Medicine

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nano, Nanotech, Nanomachines, Biotech, Bioengineering, Diagnostics, Medicine, DNA, Chemistry

Detecting HIV Diagnostic Antibodies with DNA Nanomachines

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An international team of researchers have designed and synthetized a nanometer-scale DNA “machine” whose customized modifications enable it to recognize a specific target antibody.

Science

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Neutron, x-ray diffraction, Neutron Research, Polymer, Solar Cell, photovoltaic cells, Energy, Solar Energy, nanotechnnology, Chemistry, materials and manufacturing, Chemistry & Materials, Thin Film

ORNL Researchers Find ‘Greener’ Way to Assemble Materials for Solar Applications

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Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a “greener” way to control the assembly of photovoltaic polymers in water using a surfactant—a detergent-like molecule—as a template.







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