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Science

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mass measurement, microcantilevers, eigenstates, Nanoscale, MEMS, molecule mass, mass sensing, Daichi Endo, Hiroshi Yabuno, Keiichi Higashino, Yasuyuki Yamamoto, Sohei Matsumoto, University of Tsukuba, Keio University, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Applied Physics Letters

Measuring the Mass of Molecules on the Nano-Scale

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Working with a device that slightly resembles a microscopically tiny tuning fork, researchers at the University of Tsukuba in Japan have recently developed coupled microcantilevers that can make mass measurements on the order of nanograms with only a 1 percent margin of error -- potentially enabling the weighing of individual molecules in liquid environments. The findings are published this week in Applied Physics Letters.

Science

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Physics, Materials, Phosphorous, Opto Electronics, Nanotechnology, nano, Chemistry, Semiconductors, Semiconducting, Electronics, Technology, Lasers

Black Phosphorus Reveals Its Secrets

Phosphore's striking properties a step closer to being used to improve electronic and optoelectronic devices thanks to Polytechnique Montréal and Université de Montréal researchers.

Science

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X-ray science, Graphene, Materials Science, Lasers, Scientific Computing, photon sciences

Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change the Nature of Graphene

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A new study predicts that researchers could use spiraling pulses of laser light to change the nature of graphene, turning it from a metal into an insulator and giving it other peculiar properties that might be used to encode information.

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Trending Stories Report for 27 May 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: genetics, cancer, nanotech, elderly care, marketing research, energy, children's health, and immunology.

Science

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DNA, DNA nanotechnology, Solvent, DNA assembly, non-aqueous solvent

Who Needs Water to Assemble DNA? Non-Aqueous Solvent Supports DNA Nanotechnology

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Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have now shown that they can assemble DNA nanostructures in a solvent containing no water.

Medicine

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Trending Stories Report for 26 May 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: genetics and cancer, diabetes and blindness, nanotech, engineering, personalized medicine, energy, and e-cigarettes.

Medicine

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Nanodrug , Nanomedicine, Nanomedicine Research Center, virtual biopsy, Julia Ljubimova, Eggehard Holler, Brain Tumor, Brain Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Metastatic Cancer

Nanotechnology Identifies Brain Tumor Types Through MRI “Virtual Biopsy” in Animal Studies

Biomedical researchers at Cedars-Sinai have invented a tiny drug-delivery system that can identify cancer cell types in the brain through “virtual biopsies” and then attack the molecular structure of the disease.

Science

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nano assembly, DNA, Materials Science

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles

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In a new twist on the use of DNA in nanoscale construction, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators put synthetic strands of the biological material to work in two ways: They used ropelike configurations of the DNA double helix to form a rigid geometrical framework, and added dangling pieces of single-stranded DNA to glue nanoparticles in place.

Science

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Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, Materials Science, DNA

Engineering Phase Changes in Nanoparticle Arrays

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have just taken a big step toward the goal of engineering dynamic nanomaterials whose structure and associated properties can be switched on demand. In a paper appearing in Nature Materials, they describe a way to selectively rearrange the nanoparticles in three-dimensional arrays to produce different configurations, or phases, from the same nano-components.

Science

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Single Molecule, Diode, Molecular Electronics, Miniaturization, Miniaturized Electronics, Electronics, Electricity, Asymmetric, flow, Circuit

One Step Closer to a Single-Molecule Device

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Columbia Engineering professor Latha Venkataraman has designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, and, in doing so, she has developed molecular diodes that perform 50 times better than all prior designs. Venkataraman’s group is the first to develop a single-molecule diode that may have real-world technological applications for nanoscale devices.







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