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Medicine

Science

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epigentics, mice, Microbiome, Genetics

Microbes Compete for Nutrients, Affect Metabolism, Development in Mice

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If our microbiome overindulges, we might not have access to the nutrients we need. That’s the suggestion from new research conducted by University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Federico Rey’s group that shows mice that harbor high levels of microbes that eat choline are deprived of this essential nutrient.

Medicine

Channels:

rheumatology care, FDA, Biologics, biosimilars, FDA Reauthorization Act, user fee agreements

ACR Applauds Initiatives to Speed FDA Biosimilar Approvals

“Expanding our patients’ access to safe, effective, and affordable biologic and biosimilar therapies is a top priority of the rheumatology community. Therefore, the American College of Rheumatology applauds new legislative and regulatory developments that will expedite the approval of new therapies, increase competition, and lower the cost of these drugs.

Medicine

Channels:

RNA, lncRNAs , low sperm count, sperm development, Fertility, Reproduction, Infertility, Genetics, Case Western Reserve University School Of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, long non-coding RNAs, genes, genetic causes of infertility, sperm cells

Long, Mysterious Strips of RNA Contribute to Low Sperm Count

Scientists have found distinctive portions of genetic material—known as lncRNAs—that help sperm develop. Male mice lacking a particular lncRNA have low sperm count, suggesting lncRNAs could represent novel infertility drug targets.

Medicine

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Ut Southwestern, Tumors, DNA, host defense response , Molecular Biology, Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center

DNA Sensor Plays Critical Role in Cancer Immunotherapy via Robust Response to Unexpected Form of DNA

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UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Health, Disease, DNA, Biology

DNA Detectives Crack the Case on Biothreat Look-Alikes

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Biological “detectives” are tracking down biothreats such as the bacteria that causes tularemia (“rabbit fever”), but they constantly face the challenge of avoiding false positives.

Science

Channels:

Hypothalamus, Anxiety, Wnt

Manipulating a Single Gene Defines a New Pathway to Anxiety

Removing a single gene from the brains of mice and zebrafish causes these animals to become more anxious than normal. Researchers from University of Utah Health show that eliminating the gene encoding Lef1 disrupts the development of certain nerve cells in the hypothalamus that affect stress and anxiety. These results are the first implication that Lef1 functions in this brain region to mediate behavior, knowledge that could one day prove useful for diagnosing and treating human brain disorders.

Life

Education

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Cheating, Higher Education, College Students, College Exams, Academic Dishonesty, Academic Misconduct, Education

High Achievers in Competitive Courses More Likely to Cheat on College Exams

A new study finds that students who are known as “high achievers” and take highly competitive courses are the most likely to cheat on their exams.

Medicine

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STEM careers, Genentech, Undergraduate Reseach, underrepresented minority students, Biomedical Research

Student Journeys: Passion for Research Began with Strawberries, “Star Trek” and “Gifted Hands”

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Alexa Wade’s passion for research started with a strawberry. Michael Vivian’s started while watching “Star Trek” episodes with his dad. Cameron LaFayette’s began in eighth grade from the movie “Gifted Hands,” the saga of Detroit-born neurosurgeon Ben Carson.

Medicine

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Abdominal Fat and Cancer, Abdominal Fat, Visceral Fat, Subcutaneous Fat, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Obesity, Colon Cancer, Cancer Risk, Uterine Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Body Mass Index, Tumor Growth

This Is How Belly Fat Could Increase Your Cancer Risk

A new Michigan State University study now offers new details showing that a certain protein released from fat in the body can cause a non-cancerous cell to turn into a cancerous one. The federally funded research also found that a lower layer of abdominal fat, when compared to fat just under the skin, is the more likely culprit, releasing even more of this protein and encouraging tumor growth.

Science

Channels:

epigentics, Finches, Adaptation, Evolution, Galapagos Islands, Population Genetics

Epigenetics May Explain How Darwin’s Finches Respond to Rapid Environmental Change

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Epigenetics may explain how Darwin’s finches respond to rapid environmental changes.







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