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Article ID: 686480

Mount Sinai Study to Characterize Rare Neurodevelopmental Disorder Tied to Autism

Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers seek to transform understanding of and inform precision treatment approaches to newly identified syndrome

Released:
7-Dec-2017 4:15 PM EST
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Article ID: 686412

Scientists Identify First Brain Cells That Respond to Sound

University of Maryland School of Medicine

A new study is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the “Mozart effect.”

Released:
7-Dec-2017 12:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 686306

Study: Parents’ Reports of Children’s Autism Symptoms Differ by Race

Georgia State University

Racial differences in parents’ reports of concerns about their child’s development to healthcare providers may contribute to delayed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in black children, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 685739

Autism and the Smell of Fear

Weizmann Institute of Science

The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Noam Sobel has found that persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and neurotypical persons reacted differently to the "smell of fear" and "calm sweat" - in fact, they reacted in opposite ways.

Released:
27-Nov-2017 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 685598

Video Game Improves Balance in Youth with Autism

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various “ninja” poses could help children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve their balance, according to a recent study in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Released:
21-Nov-2017 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Nov-2017 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 685014

Potential New Autism Drug Shows Promise in Mice

Scripps Research Institute

NitroSynapsin is intended to restore an electrical signaling imbalance in the brain found in virtually all forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Released:
11-Nov-2017 5:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 684993

Breakthrough Research Suggests Potential Treatment for Autism, Intellectual Disability

University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

A research team has identified the pathological mechanism for a certain type of autism and intellectual disability by creating a genetically modified mouse. They are hopeful it could eventually lead to a therapeutic fix.

Released:
10-Nov-2017 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Nov-2017 8:55 AM EST

Article ID: 684299

Closing the Rural Health Gap: Media Update from RWJF and Partners on Rural Health Disparities

Newswise

Rural counties continue to rank lowest among counties across the U.S., in terms of health outcomes. A group of national organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National 4-H Council are leading the way to close the rural health gap.

Released:
8-Nov-2017 8:55 AM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 684726

Lending Late Neurons a Helping Hand

Université de Genève (University of Geneva)

University of Geneva researchers have discovered that delayed neuronal migration in the foetus causes behavioural disorders comparable to autism.

Released:
7-Nov-2017 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 684503

In Autism, Too Many Brain Connections May Be at Root of Condition

Washington University in St. Louis

Mutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism.

Released:
2-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EDT
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