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Article ID: 689511

Everyday Activities Associated with More Gray Matter in Brains of Older Adults

Rush University Medical Center

Higher levels of lifestyle physical activity – such as house cleaning, walking a dog and gardening, as well as exercise – are associated with more gray matter in the brains of older adults, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 2:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688831

Hatchet Enzyme, Enabler of Sickness and of Health, Exposed by Neutron Beams

Georgia Institute of Technology

A pioneering glimpse at an enzyme inside elusive cell membranes elucidates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With neutron beams, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create.

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1-Feb-2018 3:35 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688525

In-Person License Renewal, not Physician Reporting, Associated with Fewer Crash Hospitalizations Among Drivers with Dementia

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Requiring physicians to report patients with dementia to state driver’s licensing authorities is not associated with fewer hospitalizations from motor vehicle crashes. However, in-person license renewal laws and vision testing dramatically cut crashes involving drivers with dementia.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688657

Microcapsules Gain a New Power — Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Stable, biocompatible microcapsules have gained a new power — the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This may aid microcapsule survival in the body as the tiny polymer capsules carry a drug or other biomolecules, or find use in antioxidant therapy or industrial applications.

Released:
30-Jan-2018 10:05 AM EST
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    30-Jan-2018 8:30 AM EST

Article ID: 688626

WVU Research Examines a Different Culprit Behind Alzheimer's Disease

West Virginia University

Amyloid plaques have long been believed to be an indicator of neurodegenerative disease. But according to Raymond Anderson, a graduate student in West Virginia University's School of Medicine, such buildup alone does not correlate with disease severity. In fact, these buildups may even protect neurons.

Released:
30-Jan-2018 8:30 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688572

Body Clock Disruptions Occur Years Before Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s

Washington University in St. Louis

People with Alzheimer’s disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of Alzheimer’s.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 4:30 PM EST
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    24-Jan-2018 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688199

Another Alzheimer's Drug Failure: Are We Nearing the End of our Rope on the Anti-Amyloid Hypothesis?

University of Kentucky

Released:
19-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST
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    24-Jan-2018 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688456

Alzheimer's Drug Targeting Soluble Amyloid Falls Short in a Large Clinical Trial

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

A paper published today in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that solanezumab, a monoclonal antibody-based treatment for Alzheimer’s disease developed by Eli Lilly that targets amyloid plaques, did not significantly slow cognitive decline.

Released:
24-Jan-2018 4:55 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688234

Drug May Help Those with Dementia with Lewy Bodies

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

New help may be on the way for people with dementia with Lewy bodies, which is the second most common neurodegenerative type of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease. The disease can cause movement problems and issues such as hallucinations in addition to thinking and memory problems. But the drug used to treat the movement problems can also exacerbate the hallucinations, delusions and other psychiatric problems.

Released:
19-Jan-2018 9:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688357

Discovery May Advance Neural Stem Cell Treatments for Brain Disorders

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

New research from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) reveals a novel gene regulatory system that may advance stem cell therapies and gene-targeting treatments for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and mental health disorders that affect cognitive abilities.

Released:
24-Jan-2018 9:00 AM EST
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