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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698322

Mayo-Led Research Team Identifies Genes That Increase Risk for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Mayo Clinic

A research team led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a geneticist at Mayo Clinic, has identified specific genes associated with an increased risk for developing triple-negative breast cancer. Their research was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Released:
3-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 7:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698635

Equipo investigativo dirigido por Mayo Clinic identifica genes que aumentan riesgo para cáncer de mama triple negativo

Mayo Clinic

Un equipo investigativo dirigido por el Dr. Fergus Couch, genetista de Mayo Clinic, identificó los genes específicos que se relacionan con mayor riesgo para cáncer de mama triple negativo. El estudio se publicó en la Revista del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer.

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6-Aug-2018 7:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698618

Created Line of Spinal Cord Neural Stem Cells Shows Diverse Promise

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that they have successfully created spinal cord neural stem cells (NSCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that differentiate into a diverse population of cells capable of dispersing throughout the spinal cord and can be maintained for long periods of time.

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6-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698613

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have found an important contributor to heart pathology caused by the cancer drug doxorubicin — disruption of metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This allows chronic, non-resolving inflammation that leads to advanced heart failure.

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6-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698608

Lessons from Flies: Genetic Diversity Impacts Disease Severity

University of Utah Health

By analyzing thousands of flies, scientists at University of Utah Health found that variation in a background gene, called Baldspot, can make a difference in severity of the disease.

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6-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698590

Smart Wristband With Wireless Link to Smartphones Could Monitor Health, Environmental Exposures

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineers have created a smart wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones that will enable a new wave of personal health and environmental monitoring devices. Their technology, which could be added to watches and other wearable devices that monitor heart rates and physical activity, is detailed in a study published online in Microsystems & Nanoengineering.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 1:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698609

Reducing NOVA1 gene helps prevent tumor growth in most common type of lung cancer

University of Michigan

Researchers have identified a gene that when inhibited or reduced, in turn, reduced or prevented human non-small cell lung cancer tumors from growing.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698577

Liquid Biopsy Could Ease the Way to Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

Researchers at UC Davis, Genentech and Foundation Medicine are the first to show that a blood-based test to assess tumor mutational burden (TMB) accurately identifies non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who could benefit from immunotherapies called checkpoint inhibitors. The blood test offers a much less invasive and more repeatable alternative to tissue testing. The study was published online today in Nature Medicine.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698480

Enzyme Helps Build Motor That Drives Neuron Death

Vanderbilt University

The process, discovered in the axons of neurons, is implicated in Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and other diseases or injuries to the nervous system.

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2-Aug-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698586

Comprehensive CAR T-cell therapy pediatric guidelines developed by MD Anderson in collaboration with the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators network

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Almost one year after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI) today published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment in the online issue of Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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