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What the World’s Tiniest ‘Monster Truck’ Reveals

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The world’s shortest race by distance — a fraction of the width of a human hair — was run on gold and silver tracks, and took a whopping 30 hours. Given that the vehicles were invisible to the naked eye, your typical racing fan might have missed it. But the April “nanorace” was a huge success for scientists working at the nanoscale. It spurred interest in molecular machines and led to a surprising new discovery, reports the team that entered a nano-sized “monster truck.”

Medicine

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Apoptosis, biogenesis, energetics, Genetics Inflammation, Ion Homeostasis, Kinase Signaling, Mito Dynamics, Mitophagy, Mitochondria, Oxidative Stress, Protein Import, Scaffolds, Physiology, American Physiological Soceity

Researchers Convene to Explore the Clinical, Translational Applications of Mitochondria

Cross-disciplinary experts who study the mitochondria will convene at the APS “Physiological Bioenergetics: Mitochondria from Bench to Bedside” conference August 27–30 in San Diego. “While mitochondria are traditionally known as the powerhouse of the cell, accumulating studies demonstrate that the shape, movement and function of these organelles control much more in the cell beyond energy levels,” said Sruti Shiva, PhD, researcher at the University of Pittsburgh and chair of the conference organizing committee.

Science

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transition metal silicides, Semiconducting, Silicon, silicide, chemical bonds, thermochemical bond dissociation energy, bond dissociation, Andrew Sevy, Jason J. Sorensen, Thomas D. Persinger, Jordan A. Franchina, Eric L. Johnson, Michael D. Morse, University Of Utah, The Journal Of Chemical Physics

Bond Dissociation Energies for Transition Metal Silicides Accurately Determined

Transition metal silicides are promising for future developments in electronic devices, but fundamental aspects of the chemical bonding between their transition metal atoms and silicon remain poorly understood. One of the most important, but poorly known, properties is the strength of these chemical bonds -- the thermochemical bond dissociation energy. Researchers from the University of Utah have investigated this, and in this week’s The Journal of Chemical Physics, they present their findings for a number of specific compounds.

Science

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Chemistry, Chemical Science, chemical sciences, Plutonium, oxidation state, Oxidations, molecular plutonium, Actinide, actinides, Radionuclide, Radionuclides, Jacs, Journal Of The American Chemical Society, heavy element, heavy elements, Elements, UCI, LANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University Of California, university of california at irvine, Radioacti

A New Oxidation State for Plutonium

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Plutonium has more verified and accessible oxidation states than any other actinide element, an important insight for energy and security applications.

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Turning Human Waste Into Plastic, Nutrients Could Aid Long-Distance Space Travel (Video)

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Imagine you’re on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you’ll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2) into chemicals to make a new one. That’s one of the ultimate goals of scientists who are developing ways to make long space trips feasible.

Medicine

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Getting Fat to ‘Talk’ Again Could Lower Blood Glucose and Weight

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Diabetes is a tough disease to manage. Oral medications, insulin shots, close monitoring of blood sugar, dietary changes and exercise can all factor into a person’s treatment regimen. Now researchers are exploring a novel, simpler approach: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels — by getting the fat to “talk” again.

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Cyborg Bacteria Outperform Plants When Turning Sunlight Into Useful Compounds (Video)

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Photosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient. To enable humans to capture more of the sun’s energy than natural photosynthesis can, scientists have taught bacteria to cover themselves in tiny, highly efficient solar panels to produce useful compounds.

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Water Purification

‘Coffee-Ring Effect’ Harnessed to Provide Rapid, Low-Cost Analysis of Tap Water (Video)

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“What’s in your water?” has become an increasingly fraught question for many people in the U.S. and around the world. Getting the answer isn’t always easy or cheap. Today, scientists are reporting that they are using the familiar “coffee-ring effect” to analyze multiple components in a single drop of water easily, quickly and cheaply. And someday, the public could use the method to test their own tap water.

Science

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Chemistry, chemical sciences, Chemical Science, Separation, Separations, Membrane, Membranes, GeorgiaTech, Georgia Institute Of Technology, Nature Materials, traffic cop for molecules, Separate, Purify, energy use, Energy Consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, Molecular Sieve, molecular separation, molecular science, carbon molecular sieves, Sieve, Selectivity

A Traffic Cop for Molecules

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Easily manufactured, rigid membranes with ultra-small pores provides to be ultra-selective in separating chemicals.

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Remarkable Artistry Hidden in Ancient Roman Painting Revealed

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Molten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element. The technique could help conservators more precisely restore this image, as well as other ancient artworks.







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