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Article ID: 697263

Biochemists Discover Cause of Genome Editing Failures with Hyped CRISPR System

University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to describe why CRISPR gene editing sometimes fails to work, and how the process can be made to be much more efficient.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 4:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697182

Crystal Structure Reveals How Curcumin Impairs Cancer

University of California San Diego Health

Through x-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers, in collaboration with researchers at Peking University and Zhejiang University, reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the atomic level. This previously unreported biochemical interaction of curcumin leads to inhibition of DYRK2 that impairs cell proliferation and reduces cancer burden.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 3:35 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jul-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 697045

How Antifreeze Proteins Stop Ice Cold

University of Utah

How do insects survive harsh northern winters? Unlike mammals, they don’t have thick coats of fur to keep warm. But they do have antifreeze. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent ice from forming and spreading inside their bodies. The existence of these AFPs has been known for decades, but the mechanisms governing this unique survival technique have proven difficult to determine.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697165

Texas Tech Researchers’ Sepsis-Detecting Chip Proves Successful in Human Study

Texas Tech University

Two years after inventing a microfluidic chip believed to help detect a life-threatening blood infection, researchers in the Texas Tech University Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center are finally seeing their product work successfully for human patients.

Released:
9-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697092

Scientists Identify Body’s Microreactors for Innate Immunity

UT Southwestern Medical Center

A DNA-sensing enzyme forms droplets that act as tiny bioreactors creating molecules to stimulate innate immunity – the body’s first response to infection, UT Southwestern researchers report.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696897

New Model for Predicting Neuroblastoma Outcomes Incorporates Early Developmental Signals

Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Motivated by a desire to better understand the molecular circuitry underlying neuroblastoma and limitations of current methods for predicting disease progression and outcome, researchers from the Kulesa Lab at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators at the University of Michigan and Oxford University set out to construct a logic-based model incorporating information about developmental signaling pathways implicated in the disease.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697077

Nature’s Antifreeze Inspires Revolutionary Bacteria Cryopreservation Technique

University of Warwick

The survival mechanisms of polar fish have led scientists at the University of Warwick to develop of a revolutionary approach to ‘freeze’ bacteria.

Released:
6-Jul-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696928

SLAC’s Ultra-High-Speed ‘Electron Camera’ Catches Molecules at a Crossroads

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

An extremely fast “electron camera” at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has produced the most detailed atomic movie of the decisive point where molecules hit by light can either stay intact or break apart. The results could lead to a better understanding of how molecules respond to light in processes that are crucial for life, like photosynthesis and vision, or that are potentially harmful, such as DNA damage from ultraviolet light.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696995

Breakthrough Synthesis Strategy Could Mean Wave of New Medicinal Products

Florida State University

Florida State scientists have devised a new strategy for synthesizing notoriously difficult carbocyclic 5-8-5 fused ring systems, a molecular structure with broad therapeutic potential.

Released:
3-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696964

Missouri S&T taps Penn State prof, NSF program director to oversee research in College of Engineering and Computing

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Dr. Angela Lueking, a professor of energy and mineral engineering and chemical engineering at Pennsylvania State University and a recent program director at the National Science Foundation, is joining Missouri S&T as associate dean of research in the College of Engineering and Computing starting Aug. 1.

Released:
2-Jul-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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