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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2017 8:05 PM EST

Article ID: 684613

Man's Earliest Ancestors Discovered In Southern England

University of Portsmouth

The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.

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7-Nov-2017 8:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2017 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 684526

How a “Flipped” Gene Helped Butterflies Evolve Mimicry

University of Chicago Medical Center

Scientists from the University of Chicago analyzed genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then.

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2-Nov-2017 5:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2017 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 684586

Scientists Find Potential “Missing Link” in Chemistry That Led to Life on Earth

Scripps Research Institute

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth.

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3-Nov-2017 3:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2017 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 684415

Caribbean Islands Reveal a “Lost World” of Ancient Mammals

Stony Brook University

A new study by an international team of scientists reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse “lost world” of Caribbean fossils that includes dozens of ancient mammals. The study reveals that the arrival of humans throughout the islands was likely the primary cause of the extinction of native mammal species there.

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1-Nov-2017 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Nov-2017 6:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 684245

Key to Better Asparagus Identified in Evolution of Sex Chromosomes

University of Georgia

Working with an international team of breeders and genome scientists, plant biologists at the University of Georgia have sequenced the genome of garden asparagus as a model for sex chromosome evolution.

Released:
31-Oct-2017 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 683651

Older Neandertal Survived with a Little Help From His Friends

Washington University in St. Louis

An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE.

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23-Oct-2017 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 683455

Suicide Molecules Kill Any Cancer Cell

Northwestern University

Small RNA molecules originally developed as a tool to study gene function trigger a mechanism hidden in every cell that forces the cell to commit suicide, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer.

Released:
19-Oct-2017 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 683386

Tracing Communism’s Reach, 100 Years After the Russian Revolution

New York University

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, NYU's Joshua Tucker talks about communism’s legacy and how the Soviet Union changed the world.

Released:
18-Oct-2017 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 683364

Death by a Thousand Cuts? Not for Small Populations

Michigan State University

In a paper published in Nature Communications, Christoph Adami, Michigan State University professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, and graduate student Thomas LaBar have provided a look at how certain species survive by evolving a greater ability to weed out harmful mutations – a new concept called “drift robustness”.

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18-Oct-2017 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 683201

Keratin, Pigment, Proteins from 54 Million-Year-Old Sea Turtle Show Survival Trait Evolution

North Carolina State University

Researchers have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54 million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago.

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17-Oct-2017 10:05 AM EDT
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