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Science

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Nanocluster, Atoms, Nanotechnologies, nanostructured systems, capture zone distribution, Yong Han, Maozhi Li, James W. Evans, Iowa State University, Renmin University of China, The Journal Of Chemical Physics

Location Matters in the Self-Assembly of Nanoclusters

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Scientists at Iowa State University have developed a new formulation that helps to explain the self-assembly of atoms into nanoclusters and to advance the scientific understanding of related nanotechnologies. Their research offers a theoretical framework to explain the relationship between the distribution of “capture zones,” the regions that surround the nanoscale “islands” formed by deposition on surfaces, and the underlying nucleation or formation process.

Science

Channels:

fish, fish biowaste, biowaste, piezoelectric energy, energy harvester, fish scales, Nanogenerator, piezoelectric materials, self-powered electronics, Sujoy Kuman Ghosh, Dipankar Mandal, Jadavpur University, Applied Physics Letters

Fish 'Biowaste' Converted to Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters

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Large quantities of fish are consumed in India on a daily basis, which generates a huge amount of fish “biowaste” materials. In an attempt to do something positive with this biowaste, a team of researchers at Jadavpur University in Koltata, India explored recycling the fish byproducts into an energy harvester for self-powered electronics.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Electronics

For First Time, Carbon Nanotube Transistors Outperform Silicon

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For decades, scientists have tried to harness the unique properties of carbon nanotubes to create faster high-performance electronics. Now, University of Wisconsin–Madison materials engineers have created carbon nanotube transistors that outperform state-of-the-art silicon transistors.

Science

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nature nanotechnology, Nanotechnology, nanotechnnology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Protons, Proton Transfer, Carbon Nanotubes, Nanoscience, Molecular Foundry, Material Science, Materials Science, material sciences, materials sciences, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, University Of California, UN, Fuel Cells, Fuel

Fast and Furious Bucket Brigade

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Carbon nanotubes that confine water into one-dimensional wires have validated a decade-old prediction and achieved rates faster than in bulk water and state-of-the-art fuel cell membranes. Ultimately, this could aid membranes for fuel cells to power your car and home.

Science

Channels:

Nanotechnology, Graphene, paper electronics

Iowa State Engineers Treat Printed Graphene with Lasers to Enable Paper Electronics, Devices

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Iowa State engineers have led development of a laser-treatment process that allows them to use printed graphene for electric circuits and electrodes -- even on paper and other fragile surfaces. The technology could lead to many real-world, low-cost applications.

Science

Channels:

Nanowires, Nanomaterials, Quantum Dot, Quantum properties, semiconductor nanostructures

Notre Dame Researchers Find Transition Point in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

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The breakthrough discovery establishes for the first time an answer to how a quantum dot evolves into a nanowire as its aspect ratio is made progressively larger.

Science

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Research & Development, Award, Chemistry, Nanotechnology

Five Brookhaven Lab Projects Selected as R&D 100 Award Finalists

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Five projects from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have been selected as finalists for the 2016 R&D 100 awards, which honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year as determined by a panel selected by R&D Magazine.

Science

Channels:

Chemistry, Physics, Material Science, Nanotechnology, Optics

Electrons at the Speed Limit

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Speed may not be witchcraft, but it is the basis for technologies that often seem like magic. Modern computers, for instance, are as powerful as they are because tiny switches inside them steer electric currents in fractions of a billionth of a second. The incredible data flows of the internet, on the other hand, are only possible because extremely fast electro-optic modulators can send information through fibre-optic cables in the shape of very short light pulses. Today's electronic circuits already routinely work at frequencies of several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second) up to terahertz (a thousand billion oscillations). The next generation of electronics will therefore, sooner or later have to reach the realm of petahertz, which is a thousand times faster still. If and how electrons can be controlled that fast, however, is still largely unknown. In a groundbreaking experiment, a team led by ETH professor Ursula Keller has now investigated how electrons react to petahert

Science

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Chemistry, Material Science, Physics, Optics, computer science and engineering, Technology

A Nanoscale Wireless Communication System via Plasmonic Antennas

Chestnut Hill, Mass. (8/25/2016) - The pursuit of next-generation technologies places a premium on producing increased speed and efficiency with components built at scales small enough to function on a computer chip.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, nanovaccine, Immunotherapy, Tumor, NIBIB, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Nanovaccine Could Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy, Reduce Side Effects

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Researchers have created a nanovaccine that could make a current approach to cancer immunotherapy more effective while also reducing side effects.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Nanomedicine, Multidrug Resistance, MDR, Doxorubicin, Drug Delivery, Nanoparticles, Chemotherapy, Nitric Oxide, Curcumin, Breast Cancer, Therapeutic, NO, chemosensitization

Overcoming Multidrug-Resistant Cancer with Smart Nanoparticles

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Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the mechanism by which many cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy. Researchers have developed nanoparticles that simultaneously deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors and inhibit the MDR proteins that pump the therapeutic drugs out of the cell, rendering tumors highly sensitive to the cancer-killing therapy.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Nanoparticle, Salmonella

Nanoparticle That Mimics Salmonella Counteracts Chemotherapy Resistance

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Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have designed a nanoparticle that mimics the bacterium Salmonella and may help to counteract a major mechanism of chemotherapy resistance.

Science

Channels:

Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health (Critical Care/Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine [Trauma/Injury])

Nanoparticles That Speed Blood Clotting May Someday Save Lives

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Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they’ve validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.

Science

Channels:

metal-organic frameworks, Chemistry, Biology, Medicine, Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, X-rays, Crystallography, NMR, Advanced Light Source, Nanoscience, Nanotech, Nanotechnology, Nanostructure, nano, 3-D

A New Way to Display the 3-D Structure of Molecules

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Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers have developed nanoscale display cases that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Biotechnology, Gastroenterolgy, Internal Medicine, Medicine And Health, Nanotechnology, Micromachines/Nanotechnology, Nutrition, Nutrient, Pharmaceutical Scieince

Lab Team Spins Ginger Into Nanoparticles to Heal Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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A recent study by researchers at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center took them to a not-so-likely destination: local farmers markets. They went in search of fresh ginger root.

Science

Channels:

Nanoscience, Construction, Energy, Efficiency

Wood Windows Are Cooler Than Glass

Transparent wood created at the University of Maryland provides better thermal insulation and lets in nearly as much light as glass, while eliminating glare and providing uniform and consistent indoor lighting. The findings advance earlier published work on their development of transparent wood.

Science

Channels:

Biomechanics & Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology, Micromachines/Nanotechnology, Pharmaceutical And Combinatorial Chemistry

Nanoribbons in Solutions Mimic Nature

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Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) bend and twist easily in solution, making them adaptable for biological uses like DNA analysis, drug delivery and biomimetic applications, according to scientists at Rice University.

Science

Channels:

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Disinfection, Water, nanotechnnology

SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster

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Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a nanostructured device, about half the size of a postage stamp, that disinfects water much faster than the UV method by also making use of the visible part of the solar spectrum, which contains 50 percent of the sun’s energy.

Science

Channels:

vortex rings, Biomedical

Vortex Rings May Aid Cell Delivery, Cell-Free Protein Production

Cornell researchers have devised a method for producing toroid-shaped particles through a process called vortex ring freezing. The particles are mass produceable through inexpensive electrospraying.

Science

Channels:

Materials Science, Instrumentation, Nanoscope

Iowa State Physicists Win W.M. Keck Foundation Grant to Develop Nanoscope

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Iowa State's Jigang Wang is leading an effort to develop a new kind of microscope for materials studies called a "nanoscope." The W.M. Keck Foundation of Los Angeles is supporting the project with a three-year, $1.3 million grant.







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